Brief Communication abstract


Nature Neuroscience 9, 875 - 877 (2006)
Published online: 28 May 2006 | Corrected online: 7 June 2006 | doi:10.1038/nn1712

Bayesian calibration of simultaneity in tactile temporal order judgment

Makoto Miyazaki1, Shinya Yamamoto2, Sunao Uchida1,3 & Shigeru Kitazawa2,4,5

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Human judgment of the temporal order of two sensory signals is liable to change depending on our prior experiences. Previous studies have reported that signals presented at short intervals but in the same order as the most frequently repeated signal are perceived as occurring simultaneously. Here we report opposite perceptual changes that conform* to a Bayesian integration theory in judging the order of two stimuli delivered one to each hand.

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  1. Advanced Research Center for Human Sciences, Faculty of Human Sciences, Waseda University, 2-579-15 Mikajima, Tokorozawa-shi, Saitama 359-1192, Japan.
  2. Neuroscience Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568, Japan.
  3. Faculty of Sport Science, Waseda University, 2-579-15 Mikajima, Tokorozawa-shi, Saitama 359-1192, Japan.
  4. CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi-shi, Saitama 305-8575, Japan.
  5. Department of Neurophysiology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421, Japan.

Correspondence to: Shigeru Kitazawa2,4,5 e-mail: kitazawa@med.juntendo.ac.jp

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