Journal home
Advance online publication
Current issue
Archive
Press releases
Supplements
Focuses
Guide to authors
Online submissionOnline submission
Permissions
For referees
Free online issue
Contact the journal
Subscribe
Advertising
work@npg
naturereprints
About this site
For librarians
 
NPG Resources
Nature
Nature Reviews Neuroscience
Nature Cell Biology
Nature Medicine
Neuroscience Gateway
UCSD-Nature Signaling Gateway
NPG Subject areas
Biotechnology
Cancer
Chemistry
Clinical Medicine
Dentistry
Development
Drug Discovery
Earth Sciences
Evolution & Ecology
Genetics
Immunology
Materials Science
Medical Research
Microbiology
Molecular Cell Biology
Neuroscience
Pharmacology
Physics
Browse all publications
Article
Nature Neuroscience  7, 56 - 64 (2003)
Published online: 21 December 2003; | doi:10.1038/nn1169

Neuron-specific contribution of the superior colliculus to overt and covert shifts of attention

Alla Ignashchenkova1, Peter W Dicke1, Thomas Haarmeier1, 2 & Peter Thier1

1  Department of Cognitive Neurology, Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany.

2  Department of General Neurology, Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany.

Correspondence should be addressed to Peter Thier thier@uni-tuebingen.de
The analysis of a peripheral visual location can be improved in two ways: either by orienting one's gaze (usually by making a foveating saccade) or by 'covertly' shifting one's attention to the peripheral location without making an eye movement. The premotor theory of attention holds that saccades and spatial shifts of attention share a common functional module with a distinct neuronal basis. Using single-unit recording from the brains of trained rhesus monkeys, we investigated whether the superior colliculus, the major subcortical center for the control of saccades, is part of this shared network for attention and saccades. Here we show that a distinct type of neuron in the intermediate layer of the superior colliculus, the visuomotor neuron, which is known to be centrally involved in the preparation of saccades, is also active during covert shifts of attention.

MORE ARTICLES LIKE THIS

These links to content published by NPG are automatically generated.

REVIEWS

Exploring the consequences of the previous trial

Nature Reviews Neuroscience Review (01 Jun 2003)

See all 16 matches for Reviews

NEWS AND VIEWS

Auditory physiology: Mobile maps in the brain

Nature News and Views (24 May 1984)

Stabilizing the visual world

Nature Neuroscience News and Views (01 Dec 2006)

See all 4 matches for News And Views
 Top
Abstract
Previous | Next
Table of contents
Full textFull text
Download PDFDownload PDF
Send to a friendSend to a friend
Save this linkSave this link

natureevents

Figures & Tables
Export citation
natureproducts

Search buyers guide:

 
ADVERTISEMENT
 
Nature Neuroscience
ISSN: 1097-6256
EISSN: 1546-1726
Journal home | Advance online publication | Current issue | Archive | Press releases | Supplements | Focuses | For authors | Online submission | Permissions | For referees | Free online issue | About the journal | Contact the journal | Subscribe | Advertising | work@npg | naturereprints | About this site | For librarians
Nature Publishing Group, publisher of Nature, and other science journals and reference works©2004 Nature Publishing Group | Privacy policy