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Brief Communication
Nature Neuroscience  5, 514 - 516 (2002)
Published online: 6 May 2002; | doi:10.1038/nn0602-849

Sniffing neuropeptides: a transnasal approach to the human brain

Jan Born1, Tanja Lange2, Werner Kern2, Gerard P. McGregor3, Ulrich Bickel4 & Horst L. Fehm2

1  Departments of Neuroendocrinology, University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck, Germany

2  Internal Medicine, University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538 Lübeck, Germany

3  Department of Physiology, University of Marburg, Deutschhausstrasse 2, 35037 Marburg, Germany

4  Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, School of Pharmacy, 1300 Coulter Drive, Amarillo, Texas 79106, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Jan Born born@kfg.mu-luebeck.de
Neuropeptides act as neuronal messengers in the brain, influencing many neurobehavioral functions1. Their experimental and therapeutic use in humans has been hampered because, when administered systemically, these compounds do not readily pass the blood−brain barrier, and they evoke potent hormone-like side effects when circulating in the blood2, 3. We administered three peptides, melanocortin(4−10) (MSH/ACTH(4−10)), vasopressin and insulin, intranasally and found that they achieved direct access to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within 30 minutes, bypassing the bloodstream.


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Nature Neuroscience
ISSN: 1097-6256
EISSN: 1546-1726
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