Journal home
Advance online publication
Current issue
Archive
Press releases
Supplements
Focuses
Guide to authors
Online submissionOnline submission
Permissions
For referees
Free online issue
Contact the journal
Subscribe
Advertising
work@npg
naturereprints
About this site
For librarians
 
NPG Resources
Nature
Nature Reviews Neuroscience
Nature Cell Biology
Nature Medicine
Neuroscience Gateway
UCSD-Nature Signaling Gateway
NPG Subject areas
Biotechnology
Cancer
Chemistry
Clinical Medicine
Dentistry
Development
Drug Discovery
Earth Sciences
Evolution & Ecology
Genetics
Immunology
Materials Science
Medical Research
Microbiology
Molecular Cell Biology
Neuroscience
Pharmacology
Physics
Browse all publications
Article
Nature Neuroscience  2, 358 - 363 (1999)
doi:10.1038/7268

Dopamine activation of endogenous cannabinoid signaling in dorsal striatum

A. Giuffrida1, 4, L. H. Parsons2, 4, T. M. Kerr2, F. Rodríguez de Fonseca3, M. Navarro3 & D. Piomelli1

1  Department of Pharmacology, 360 Med Surge II, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, California 92697-4625, USA

2  Department of Neuropharmacology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA

3  Department of Psychobiology, Universidad Complutense, Madrid, 28233, Spain

4  The first two authors contributed equally to this work.

Correspondence should be addressed to D. Piomelli piomelli@uci.edu
We measured endogenous cannabinoid release in dorsal striatum of freely moving rats by microdialysis and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Neural activity stimulated the release of anandamide, but not of other endogenous cannabinoids such as 2-arachidonylglycerol. Moreover, anandamide release was increased eightfold over baseline after local administration of the D 2-like (D2, D3, D4) dopamine receptor agonist quinpirole, a response that was prevented by the D2-like receptor antagonist raclopride. Administration of the D1-like (D 1, D5) receptor agonist SKF38393 had no such effect. These results suggest that functional interactions between endocannabinoid and dopaminergic systems may contribute to striatal signaling. In agreement with this hypothesis, pretreatment with the cannabinoid antagonist SR141716A enhanced the stimulation of motor behavior elicited by systemic administration of quinpirole. The endocannabinoid system therefore may act as an inhibitory feedback mechanism countering dopamine-induced facilitation of motor activity.

 Top
Abstract
Previous | Next
Table of contents
Full textFull text
Download PDFDownload PDF
Send to a friendSend to a friend
Save this linkSave this link

natureevents

Figures & Tables
See also: News and Views by Self
Export citation
natureproducts

Search buyers guide:

 
ADVERTISEMENT
 
Nature Neuroscience
ISSN: 1097-6256
EISSN: 1546-1726
Journal home | Advance online publication | Current issue | Archive | Press releases | Supplements | Focuses | For authors | Online submission | Permissions | For referees | Free online issue | About the journal | Contact the journal | Subscribe | Advertising | work@npg | naturereprints | About this site | For librarians
Nature Publishing Group, publisher of Nature, and other science journals and reference works©1999 Nature Publishing Group | Privacy policy