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Impaired spatial selectivity and intact phase precession in two-dimensional virtual reality

Journal name:
Nature Neuroscience
Volume:
18,
Pages:
121–128
Year published:
DOI:
doi:10.1038/nn.3884
Last updated: 19 October 2017 20:26:58 EDT

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