NASA, ESA/Hubble (R. Fedriani et al)

Measuring the ionisation fraction in a jet from a massive protostar

Latest Research

Physical sciences

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  • Article
    | Open Access

    There are a number of non-trivial integrable models in one-dimension, making them an attractive starting point for studying quantum dynamics. Biella et al. study transport between two semi-infinite solvable models and show that a slowly-relaxing region forms around the integrability-breaking junction.

    • Alberto Biella
    • , Mario Collura
    • , Davide Rossini
    • , Andrea De Luca
    •  & Leonardo Mazza
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Metal-mediated base pairs expand the repertoire of nucleic acid structures and dynamics. Here, the authors prepared a metallo-DNA duplex including two C-Hg(II)-T base pairs separated by six normal Watson-Crick base pairs and investigated its solution structure and dynamics using NMR spectroscopy.

    • Olivia P. Schmidt
    • , Simon Jurt
    • , Silke Johannsen
    • , Ashkan Karimi
    • , Roland K. O. Sigel
    •  & Nathan W. Luedtke
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Nanoscale biological assemblies play crucial roles in all living systems and display a variety of chemical functionalities. Here the authors show that it is possible to replicate some of the biochemical functions in similarly-sized assemblies made from inorganic nanoparticles.

    • Si Li
    • , Juan Liu
    • , Naomi S. Ramesar
    • , Hendrik Heinz
    • , Liguang Xu
    • , Chuanlai Xu
    •  & Nicholas A. Kotov

Earth and environmental sciences

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  • Article
    | Open Access

    Diatoms drive biogeochemical cycling of aluminum by incorporating this element into their shells, but this process has not been quantified in freshwater systems. Here the authors quantify diatom-mediated aluminum fluxes in lakes and determine that they rival the aluminum sink in the global ocean.

    • Dong Liu
    • , Peng Yuan
    • , Qian Tian
    • , Hongchang Liu
    • , Liangliang Deng
    • , Yaran Song
    • , Junming Zhou
    • , Dusan Losic
    • , Jieyu Zhou
    • , Hongzhe Song
    • , Haozhe Guo
    •  & Wenxiao Fan
  • Article
    | Open Access

    This study seeks to tackle the question of why intermediate magmatic rock compositions are poorly represented on the Earth’s surface. The authors do so by tracking the evolution of the physical behaviour of immiscible Fe-rich liquids within a sample suite from the lava lake on the Kilauea Iki volcano, Hawaii.

    • Victoria C. Honour
    • , Marian B. Holness
    • , Bernard Charlier
    • , Sandra C. Piazolo
    • , Olivier Namur
    • , Ty J. Prosa
    • , Isabelle Martin
    • , Rosalind T. Helz
    • , John Maclennan
    •  & Marlon M. Jean
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Based on single worm whole genome sequencing, the authors here characterise the global evolution of the gastrointestinal parasite Haemonchus contortus and identify genes that play a role in drug resistance as well as climate-driven adaptations involving an epigenetic regulator.

    • G. Sallé
    • , S. R. Doyle
    • , J. Cortet
    • , J. Cabaret
    • , M. Berriman
    • , N. Holroyd
    •  & J. A. Cotton

Biological sciences

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    | Open Access

    During cell division, tetraploidy can drive chromosomal instability (CIN) via supernumerary centrosomes, but it is unclear if this is the only route to CIN. Here the authors show that, in early mouse embryos, tetraploidy can drive chromosomal instability by altering microtubule dynamics and attachment.

    • Lia Mara Gomes Paim
    •  & Greg FitzHarris
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Metal-mediated base pairs expand the repertoire of nucleic acid structures and dynamics. Here, the authors prepared a metallo-DNA duplex including two C-Hg(II)-T base pairs separated by six normal Watson-Crick base pairs and investigated its solution structure and dynamics using NMR spectroscopy.

    • Olivia P. Schmidt
    • , Simon Jurt
    • , Silke Johannsen
    • , Ashkan Karimi
    • , Roland K. O. Sigel
    •  & Nathan W. Luedtke
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Nanoconfinement effects on changing molecular transport and reaction kinetics in heterogeneous catalysis have been widely recognized. Here, the authors design a core-shell nanocatalyst with aligned linear nanopores to uncover nanoconfinement effects on catalytic activity and adsorption strength by single molecule imaging.

    • Bin Dong
    • , Yuchen Pei
    • , Nourhan Mansour
    • , Xuemei Lu
    • , Kai Yang
    • , Wenyu Huang
    •  & Ning Fang

Health sciences

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  • Article
    | Open Access

    Shigella sonnei is one of the main species causing shigellosis worldwide. Here the authors analyse nearly 400 S. sonnei genome sequences and carry out experimental evolution experiments to shed light into the evolutionary processes underlying the recent emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance in this pathogen.

    • Hao Chung The
    • , Christine Boinett
    • , Duy Pham Thanh
    • , Claire Jenkins
    • , Francois-Xavier Weill
    • , Benjamin P. Howden
    • , Mary Valcanis
    • , Niall De Lappe
    • , Martin Cormican
    • , Sonam Wangchuk
    • , Ladaporn Bodhidatta
    • , Carl J. Mason
    • , To Nguyen Thi Nguyen
    • , Tuyen Ha Thanh
    • , Vinh Phat Voong
    • , Vu Thuy Duong
    • , Phu Huong Lan Nguyen
    • , Paul Turner
    • , Ryan Wick
    • , Pieter-Jan Ceyssens
    • , Guy Thwaites
    • , Kathryn E. Holt
    • , Nicholas R. Thomson
    • , Maia A. Rabaa
    •  & Stephen Baker
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Currently there are no therapeutics for long lasting central nervous system injuries, that can address the complex injury cascade that develops over years. Here the authors report biomaterial scaffolds that release 17β-estradiol (E2) at nanomolar concentrations over the course of 1–10 years via slow hydrolysis in vitro.

    • Anthony R. D’Amato
    • , Devan L. Puhl
    • , Samuel A. T. Ellman
    • , Bailey Balouch
    • , Ryan J. Gilbert
    •  & Edmund F. Palermo
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Activation of T cells in the tumor microenvironment can be inhibited through a variety of mechanisms. Here, the authors show that Rasal1, a GTPase-activating protein, binds and inhibits signaling downstream of the T Cell Receptor complex and that consistently, its reduced expression enhances anti-tumor T-cell responses in two syngeneic cancer mouse models.

    • Youg Raj Thaker
    • , Monika Raab
    • , Klaus Strebhardt
    •  & Christopher E. Rudd

News & Comment

  • Q&A
    | Open Access

    Professor Marie Edmonds is a volcanologist at the University of Cambridge. She is interested in the role of magmatic volatiles in magma genesis, volcanic eruptions, and volatile geochemical cycling. Dr. Robert Hazen is a geologist at Carnegie Science and executive director of the Deep Carbon Observatory. His latest research has focused on the co-evolution of the geospheres and biospheres, and mineral diversity and distribution. Marie and Robert apply their research to help understand the chemical and biological roles of carbon in Earth.

  • Q&A
    | Open Access

    Dmitri Strukov (an electrical engineer, University of California at Santa Barbara), Giacomo Indiveri (an electrical engineer, University of Zurich), Julie Grollier (a material physicist, Unite Mixte de Physique CNRS) and Stefano Fusi (a neuroscientist, Columbia University) talked to Nature Communications about the opportunities and challenges in developing brain-inspired computing technologies, namely neuromorphic computing, and advocated effective collaborations crossing multidisciplinary research areas to support this emerging community.

  • Comment
    | Open Access

    Plastic pollution is a purely anthropogenic problem and cannot be solved without large-scale human action. Motivating mitigation actions requires more realistic assumptions about human decision-making based on empirical evidence from the behavioural sciences enabling the design of more effective interventions.

    • Lili Jia
    • , Steve Evans
    •  & Sander van der Linden
  • Comment
    | Open Access

    Understanding complex functional materials suffers from needing to capture structural features on many length scales. By quantitatively combining complementary experimental measurements, realistic models can now be generated. Here, I discuss the strengths and limits of this approach, but also advocate focusing on the interactions that drive structural complexity instead.

    • Andrew L. Goodwin
  • Editorial
    | Open Access

    Originally designed for measuring isotope abundances and elemental masses, mass spectrometry is becoming a mainstay across life sciences. As electrospray ionization of biomolecules turns 30 and the Orbitrap mass analyzer 20, we take this opportunity to highlight the role of both inventions in stirring mass spectrometry from physics into biology and discuss the advances and challenges that may impact the future applications of biomolecular mass spectrometry.

  • Comment
    | Open Access

    John Fenn’s electrospray mass spectrometry (ESMS) was awarded the chemistry Nobel Prize in 2002 and is now the basis of the entire field of MS-based proteomics. Technological progress continues unabated, enabling single cell sensitivity and clinical applications.

    • Matthias Mann

Focus

Stem Cells and Disease

Wenjuan Pu et al./doi:10.1038/ncomms13369

Stem Cells and Disease

Editors' Highlights: Each month our editors select a small number of Articles recently published in Nature Communications that they believe are particularly interesting or important.

Ann Le Good, Ylenia Lombardo, Alfredo Sansone and Robert Stephenson

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