Dorothee Bornhorst et al.

Biomechanical signalling coordinates endocardial and myocardial growth in the zebrafish heart

Latest Research

Physical sciences

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  • Article
    | Open Access

    Single-molecule in vitro assays require dedicated confocal microscopes equipped with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) modules. Here the authors present a compact, cheap and open-source 3D-printed confocal microscope for single photon counting and FCS measurements, and use it to detect α-synuclein aggregation.

    • James W. P. Brown
    • , Arnaud Bauer
    • , Mark E Polinkovsky
    • , Akshay Bhumkar
    • , Dominic J. B. Hunter
    • , Katharina Gaus
    • , Emma Sierecki
    •  & Yann Gambin
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Organoid cultures have been developed from multiple tissues, opening new possibilities for regenerative medicine. Here the authors demonstrate the derivation of GMP-compliant hydrogels from decellularized porcine small intestine which support formation and growth of human gastric, liver, pancreatic and small intestinal organoids.

    • Giovanni Giuseppe Giobbe
    • , Claire Crowley
    • , Camilla Luni
    • , Sara Campinoti
    • , Moustafa Khedr
    • , Kai Kretzschmar
    • , Martina Maria De Santis
    • , Elisa Zambaiti
    • , Federica Michielin
    • , Laween Meran
    • , Qianjiang Hu
    • , Gijs van Son
    • , Luca Urbani
    • , Anna Manfredi
    • , Monica Giomo
    • , Simon Eaton
    • , Davide Cacchiarelli
    • , Vivian S. W. Li
    • , Hans Clevers
    • , Paola Bonfanti
    • , Nicola Elvassore
    •  & Paolo De Coppi
  • Article
    | Open Access

    XACT is a primate-specific TE-derived lncRNA that coats active X chromosomes in pluripotent cells and may contribute to species-specific regulation of X chromosome inactivation. Here, the authors investigate TEs associated with the XACT locus and identify a critical enhancer for its regulation, which evolved from an ancestral group of mammalian endogenous retroviruses, prior to the emergence of XACT.

    • Miguel Casanova
    • , Madeleine Moscatelli
    • , Louis Édouard Chauvière
    • , Christophe Huret
    • , Julia Samson
    • , Tharvesh Moideen Liyakat Ali
    • , Olga Rosspopoff
    •  & Claire Rougeulle

Earth and environmental sciences

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  • Article
    | Open Access

    Earth’s carbon cycle and oceanic magnesium cycle are controlled by processes such as weathering, volcanism and precipitation of carbonates, such as dolomite. Here, the authors contradict the view that modern dolomite formation is rare and suggest instead that dolomite accounts for ~40–60% of the global oceanic Mg output in the last 20 Ma.

    • Netta Shalev
    • , Tomaso R. R. Bontognali
    • , C. Geoffrey Wheat
    •  & Derek Vance
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Numerous feathered dinosaurs and early birds have been discovered from the Jurassic and Cretaceous, but the early evolution of feather-feeding insects is not clear. Here, Gao et al. describe a new family of ectoparasitic insects from 10 specimens found associated with feathers in mid-Cretaceous amber.

    • Taiping Gao
    • , Xiangchu Yin
    • , Chungkun Shih
    • , Alexandr P. Rasnitsyn
    • , Xing Xu
    • , Sha Chen
    • , Chen Wang
    •  & Dong Ren
  • Article
    | Open Access

    The contribution of symbiotic dinitrogen fixation to the forest carbon sink could change throughout forest succession. Here the authors model nitrogen cycling and light competition between trees based on data from Panamanian forest plots, showing that fixation contributes substantially to the carbon sink in early successional stages.

    • Jennifer H. Levy-Varon
    • , Sarah A. Batterman
    • , David Medvigy
    • , Xiangtao Xu
    • , Jefferson S. Hall
    • , Michiel van Breugel
    •  & Lars O. Hedin

Biological sciences

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  • Article
    | Open Access

    Phagocytosis is a typically eukaryotic feature that could be behind the origin of eukaryotic cells. Here, the authors describe a bacterium that can engulf other bacteria and small eukaryotic cells through a phagocytosis-like mechanism.

    • Takashi Shiratori
    • , Shigekatsu Suzuki
    • , Yukako Kakizawa
    •  & Ken-ichiro Ishida
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Lactobacillus associates with vaginal protection from HIV-1 infection. Here, the authors show that lactobacilli extracellular vesicles contain bacterial proteins and metabolites that inhibit HIV-1 infection in T cells and in human cervico-vaginal and tonsillar tissues ex vivo via altering viral Env proteins.

    • Rogers A. Ñahui Palomino
    • , Christophe Vanpouille
    • , Luca Laghi
    • , Carola Parolin
    • , Kamran Melikov
    • , Peter Backlund
    • , Beatrice Vitali
    •  & Leonid Margolis
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Single-molecule in vitro assays require dedicated confocal microscopes equipped with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) modules. Here the authors present a compact, cheap and open-source 3D-printed confocal microscope for single photon counting and FCS measurements, and use it to detect α-synuclein aggregation.

    • James W. P. Brown
    • , Arnaud Bauer
    • , Mark E Polinkovsky
    • , Akshay Bhumkar
    • , Dominic J. B. Hunter
    • , Katharina Gaus
    • , Emma Sierecki
    •  & Yann Gambin

Health sciences

See All
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Lactobacillus associates with vaginal protection from HIV-1 infection. Here, the authors show that lactobacilli extracellular vesicles contain bacterial proteins and metabolites that inhibit HIV-1 infection in T cells and in human cervico-vaginal and tonsillar tissues ex vivo via altering viral Env proteins.

    • Rogers A. Ñahui Palomino
    • , Christophe Vanpouille
    • , Luca Laghi
    • , Carola Parolin
    • , Kamran Melikov
    • , Peter Backlund
    • , Beatrice Vitali
    •  & Leonid Margolis
  • Article
    | Open Access

    Innate immune cells can be trained by some stimuli or pathogen exposures to be metabolically and epigenetically altered such that they have different responses to subsequent exposures. Here the authors show that low-dose LPS trained macrophages and BCG-trained macrophages have opposing effects on fibrosis and inflammation in the context of systemic sclerosis.

    • Mohamed Jeljeli
    • , Luiza Gama Coelho Riccio
    • , Ludivine Doridot
    • , Charlotte Chêne
    • , Carole Nicco
    • , Sandrine Chouzenoux
    • , Quentin Deletang
    • , Yannick Allanore
    • , Niloufar Kavian
    •  & Frédéric Batteux
  • Article
    | Open Access

    BRCA1 mutations located within the BRCT domain result in proteasomal degradation and sensitivity to PARP inhibitors (PARPi). Here, the authors report genetic rearrangements in the BRCA1 gene that generate a BRCT-less BRCA1 protein isoform, which avoids degradation and leads to PARPi resistance.

    • Yifan Wang
    • , Andrea J. Bernhardy
    • , Joseph Nacson
    • , John J. Krais
    • , Yin-Fei Tan
    • , Emmanuelle Nicolas
    • , Marc R. Radke
    • , Elizabeth Handorf
    • , Alba Llop-Guevara
    • , Judith Balmaña
    • , Elizabeth M. Swisher
    • , Violeta Serra
    • , Suraj Peri
    •  & Neil Johnson

News & Comment

  • Comment
    | Open Access

    A controversial discussion on the occurrence of the RNA modification m1A in mRNA takes a new turn, as an antibody with a central role in modification mapping was shown to also bind mRNA cap structures.

    • Mark Helm
    • , Frank Lyko
    •  & Yuri Motorin
  • Editorial
    | Open Access

    The amplified warming of the Arctic in recent decades has been related to extreme weather events over the mid-latitudes, but its relative importance compared to other influences is not yet well understood. A Nature Research collection highlights evidence from theoretical and observational studies, as well as implications for future extreme events.

  • Comment
    | Open Access

    The European Space Agency (ESA) recently selected Comet Interceptor as its first ‘fast’ (F-class) mission. It will be developed rapidly to share a launch with another mission and is unique, as it will wait in space for a yet-to-be-discovered comet.

    • Colin Snodgrass
    •  & Geraint H Jones
  • Comment
    | Open Access

    As climate change thaws the Arctic’s foundations, new subterranean waterways form and threaten to wash away and decompose carbon once locked in permafrost. In this Comment, Vonk and co-authors outline a cross-disciplinary strategy--with hydrology at the forefront--to better understand the fate of Arctic carbon.

    • J. E. Vonk
    • , S. E. Tank
    •  & M. A. Walvoord
  • Q&A
    | Open Access

    Professor Marie Edmonds is a volcanologist at the University of Cambridge. She is interested in the role of magmatic volatiles in magma genesis, volcanic eruptions, and volatile geochemical cycling. Dr. Robert Hazen is a geologist at Carnegie Science and executive director of the Deep Carbon Observatory. His latest research has focused on the co-evolution of the geospheres and biospheres, and mineral diversity and distribution. Marie and Robert apply their research to help understand the chemical and biological roles of carbon in Earth.

  • Q&A
    | Open Access

    Dmitri Strukov (an electrical engineer, University of California at Santa Barbara), Giacomo Indiveri (an electrical engineer, University of Zurich), Julie Grollier (a material physicist, Unite Mixte de Physique CNRS) and Stefano Fusi (a neuroscientist, Columbia University) talked to Nature Communications about the opportunities and challenges in developing brain-inspired computing technologies, namely neuromorphic computing, and advocated effective collaborations crossing multidisciplinary research areas to support this emerging community.

Focus

Energy Materials

DAVID PARKER/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY/Getty

Energy Materials

Editors' Highlights: Each month our editors select a small number of Articles recently published in Nature Communications that they believe are particularly interesting or important.

Prateek Dongare, Benjamin Martindale, Adam Weingarten and Yaoqing Zhang

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