Most read

This list of most read articles is created by calculating article views for the previous 15 days. It is refreshed daily.

Showing: 1–25 of 50

  1. CRISPR catch-up

    The hegemony of the CRISPR system as a gene-editing therapy is not as assured as its use as a tool in basic research.
  2. CRISPR-Cas systems for editing, regulating and targeting genomes

    Skip authorsShow fewer authors

    Targeted genome editing using engineered nucleases has rapidly gone from being a niche technology to a mainstream method used by many biological researchers. This widespread adoption has been largely fueled by the emergence of the clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) technology, an important new approach for generating RNA-guided nucleases, such as Cas9, with customizable specificities. Genome editing mediated by these nucleases has been used to rapidly, easily and efficiently modify endogenous genes in a wide variety of biomedically important cell types and in organisms that have traditionally been challenging to manipulate genetically. Furthermore, a modified version of the CRISPR-Cas9 system has been developed to recruit heterologous domains that can regulate endogenous gene expression or label specific genomic loci in living cells. Although the genome-wide specificities of CRISPR-Cas9 systems remain to be fully defined, the power of these systems to perform targeted, highly efficient alterations of genome sequence and gene expression will undoubtedly transform biological research and spur the development of novel molecular therapeutics for human disease.

  3. Discovering and linking public omics data sets using the Omics Discovery Index

    Skip authorsShow fewer authors
  4. Next-generation DNA sequencing

    Skip authorsShow fewer authors

    DNA sequence represents a single format onto which a broad range of biological phenomena can be projected for high-throughput data collection. Over the past three years, massively parallel DNA sequencing platforms have become widely available, reducing the cost of DNA sequencing by over two orders of magnitude, and democratizing the field by putting the sequencing capacity of a major genome center in the hands of individual investigators. These new technologies are rapidly evolving, and near-term challenges include the development of robust protocols for generating sequencing libraries, building effective new approaches to data-analysis, and often a rethinking of experimental design. Next-generation DNA sequencing has the potential to dramatically accelerate biological and biomedical research, by enabling the comprehensive analysis of genomes, transcriptomes and interactomes to become inexpensive, routine and widespread, rather than requiring significant production-scale efforts.

  5. A CRISPR-Cas9 gene drive system targeting female reproduction in the malaria mosquito vector Anopheles gambiae

    Skip authorsShow fewer authors

    Development of a CRISPR/Cas9-based gene drive system in Anopheles gambiae, the main vector for the malaria parasite, paves the way for control of this pest insect.

  6. Induction of functional dopamine neurons from human astrocytes in vitro and mouse astrocytes in a Parkinson's disease model

    Skip authorsShow fewer authors

    In vivo reprogramming of astrocytes to dopamine neurons improves motor behavior in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

  7. In vivo genome editing and organoid transplantation models of colorectal cancer and metastasis

    Skip authorsShow fewer authors

    Metastatic progression of colorectal cancer is modeled in mice using in vivo genome editing and transplantation of engineered organoids.

  8. Targeted base editing in rice and tomato using a CRISPR-Cas9 cytidine deaminase fusion

    Skip authorsShow fewer authors

    Targeted editing of single base pairs is achieved in monocot rice and dicot tomato using Target-AID (Cas9 activation-induced cytidine deaminase fusion).