Table of contents


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Editorial

Joining forces p959

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-959

Similar to outsourcing in the corporate world, technology incubators are beginning to look beyond their own borders to find technology.


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News

Pfizer settles largest ever fraud suit for off-label promotion pp961 - 962

Mark Ratner

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-961


WHO guidelines presage US biosimilars legislation? pp963 - 965

John Hodgson

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-963a


Surprise ruling eases diagnostic makers' fears p963

Emily Waltz

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-963b


Variant predicts HCV response p964

Mike May

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-964a


First-to-market loses grip p964

Bob Carlson

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-964b


Genzyme backs Osiris, despite Prochymal flop pp966 - 967

Malorye Allison

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-966


One shot at H1N1 p967

Wendy Wolfson

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-967a


'GMO-free' logos p967

Emily Waltz

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-967b


Genentech obtains proof of concept for hedgehog inhibition pp968 - 969

Cormac Sheridan

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-968


Puerto Rico GM crop haven p970

Veronica Guerrero

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-970a


Kick-start for Canada's agbio p970

John Hodgson

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-970b


Courts upbraid USDA for 'lax review' of GM crops p970

Emily Waltz

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-970c


Q&A

Steve Reed pp971 - 972

Charlotte Schubert

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-971

Steve Reed believes the organization he has founded has the potential to radically increase the developing world's access to vaccines for neglected diseases. The efforts of the Seattle-based Infectious Disease Research Institute (IDRI), which operates as a not-for-profit biotech company, may start to pay off during the H1N1 'swine' flu pandemic. IDRI developed an adjuvant to boost the effectiveness and supplies of flu vaccines and is making the technology available to vaccine manufacturers in developing nations. Charlotte Schubert talks to Reed about how IDRI, a 90-person operation with a $19 million annual budget, could have such a big impact.


Data Page

Biotech strikes back in Q3 p973

Walter Yang

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-973


News Features

Whatever happened to GM wheat? pp974 - 976

Jeffrey L Fox

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-974

Agribusiness is taking another run at transgenic wheat after shelving its programs five years ago because of concerns from farmers, trade organizations and even state governments about market acceptance. Will there be a market this time? Jeffrey Fox investigates.


The gold rush for induced pluripotent stem cells pp977 - 979

Sarah Webb

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-977

As the first commercial ventures are formed around induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell research, who will have the freedom to operate commercially remains a big unknown. Sarah Webb reports.


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Bioentrepreneur

Building a business

The valuation high ground pp980 - 983

Jeffrey J Stewart & Ben Bonifant

doi:10.1038/bioe.2009.9


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Opinion and Comment

Correspondence

The market value of GM products p984

Rob Carlson

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-984a


Accreditation and attribution in data sharing pp984 - 985

Gudmundur A Thorisson

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-984b


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Commentary

How Tysabri survived p986

Brady Huggett

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-986

Most drugs withdrawn from the market because of serious toxicities never make it back. But Biogen Idec succeeded in getting its multiple sclerosis (MS) drug Tysabri reintroduced in less than 16 months.


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Features

What's fueling the biotech engine—2008 pp987 - 993

Saurabh Aggarwal

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-987

Despite the global economic slowdown, biologics managed single-digit growth in 2008, driven mainly by continued high growth in sales of antibodies and insulins. Novel biologics in development look promising, but crowding, pricing and reimbursement are emerging as longer-term concerns.


Patents

The role of patents in biodiversity conservation pp994 - 995

Charles Lawson

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-994

Patents may not establish clear property and use rights and this may promote biodiversity destruction and decline. What is needed are schemes for patents to suit conservation and sustainable-use objectives.


Recent patent applications in biological imaging p996

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-996


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News and Views

Watching reprogramming in real time pp997 - 998

Deepa Subramanyam & Robert Blelloch

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-997

As a differentiated cell proceeds toward the pluripotent state, markers turn on and off in an orderly fashion.

See also: Research by Chan et al.


Targeted sequencing with microfluidics pp998 - 999

Ewen F Kirkness

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-998

Combining microdroplet PCR with flow-cell technologies provides a novel approach for sequencing thousands of genomic targets.

See also: Research by Tewhey et al.


A systems view of host defense pp999 - 1001

Daniel E Zak & Alan Aderem

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-999

Large-scale perturbations unravel the complex networks of activated dendritic cells.


Mapping duplicated sequences pp1001 - 1002

Derek Y Chiang & Steven A McCarroll

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-1001

Duplicated genomic regions are accurately resolved using an optimized algorithm for mapping reads from next-generation sequencers.


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Research Highlights

Research highlights p1003

Laura De Francesco, Markus Elsner, Peter Hare & Craig Mak

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-1003


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Computational Biology

Analysis

An integrative approach to reveal driver gene fusions from paired-end sequencing data in cancer pp1005 - 1011

Xiao-Song Wang, John R Prensner, Guoan Chen, Qi Cao, Bo Han, Saravana M Dhanasekaran, Rakesh Ponnala, Xuhong Cao, Sooryanarayana Varambally, Dafydd G Thomas, Thomas J Giordano, David G Beer, Nallasivam Palanisamy, Maureen A Sartor, Gilbert S Omenn & Arul M Chinnaiyan

doi:10.1038/nbt.1584

With a flood of cancer genome sequences expected soon, distinguishing 'driver' from 'passenger' mutations will be an important task. Wang et al. describe a bioinformatic method for identifying cancer-associated fusions and apply it to discover a recurrent rearrangement in lung cancer.


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Research

Review

The challenges of sequencing by synthesis pp1013 - 1023

Carl W Fuller, Lyle R Middendorf, Steven A Benner, George M Church, Timothy Harris, Xiaohua Huang, Stevan B Jovanovich, John R Nelson, Jeffery A Schloss, David C Schwartz & Dmitri V Vezenov

doi:10.1038/nbt.1585


Article

Microdroplet-based PCR enrichment for large-scale targeted sequencing pp1025 - 1031

Ryan Tewhey, Jason B Warner, Masakazu Nakano, Brian Libby, Martina Medkova, Patricia H David, Steve K Kotsopoulos, Michael L Samuels, J Brian Hutchison, Jonathan W Larson, Eric J Topol, Michael P Weiner, Olivier Harismendy, Jeff Olson, Darren R Link & Kelly A Frazer

doi:10.1038/nbt.1583

In many sequencing applications, it is sufficient to sequence selected portions of a genome rather than the complete genome. Tewhey et al. describe an approach for massively parallel genome targeting that relies on PCR in microdroplets generated by a microfluidic device.

See also: News and Views by Kirkness


Letters

Live cell imaging distinguishes bona fide human iPS cells from partially reprogrammed cells pp1033 - 1037

Elayne M Chan, Sutheera Ratanasirintrawoot, In-Hyun Park, Philip D Manos, Yuin-Han Loh, Hongguang Huo, Justine D Miller, Odelya Hartung, Junsung Rho, Tan A Ince, George Q Daley & Thorsten M Schlaeger

doi:10.1038/nbt.1580

Methods for reprogramming human cells are unable to prospectively distinguish bona fide induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from partially reprogrammed cells. Using live imaging to monitor cell fate, Chan et al. identify a set of markers that allows identification of rare iPS cells within a heterogeneous cell population.

See also: News and Views by Subramanyam & Blelloch


Transcriptional analysis of intracytoplasmically stained, FACS-purified cells by high-throughput, quantitative nuclease protection pp1038 - 1042

Susanne Pechhold, Melissa Stouffer, Gregory Walker, Ralph Martel, Bruce Seligmann, Yan Hang, Roland Stein, David M Harlan & Klaus Pechhold

doi:10.1038/nbt.1579

Cells that have been purified by FACS using intracellular markers are not amenable to gene expression analysis by conventional methods. Pechhold et al. solve this problem with the quantitative nuclease protection assay and apply the approach to study subsets of islet cells.


Resources

The transcription unit architecture of the Escherichia coli genome pp1043 - 1049

Byung-Kwan Cho, Karsten Zengler, Yu Qiu, Young Seoub Park, Eric M Knight, Christian L Barrett, Yuan Gao & Bernhard Ø Palsson

doi:10.1038/nbt.1582

Cho et al. reconstruct the regulatory and functional architecture of the E. coli genome by integrating data from several high-throughput measurements. The detailed map will allow the development of improved models of the networks that control the bacterium's transcription and translation.


Comprehensive characterization of cytochrome P450 isozyme selectivity across chemical libraries pp1050 - 1055

Henrike Veith, Noel Southall, Ruili Huang, Tim James, Darren Fayne, Natalia Artemenko, Min Shen, James Inglese, Christopher P Austin, David G Lloyd & Douglas S Auld

doi:10.1038/nbt.1581

Cytochrome P450 enzymes metabolize drugs and contribute to harmful drug-drug interactions. To decipher p450 activities, Veith et al. screen approx17,000 compounds, including >1,000 FDA-approved drugs, against five important P450 isozymes and identify chemical structures that are enriched in compounds active against specific isozymes.


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Careers and Recruitment

A third quarter improvement for biotech hiring p1056

Michael Francisco

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-1056


People

People p1058

doi:10.1038/nbt1109-1058


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