Research abstract

Article abstract


Nature Biotechnology 23, 1407 - 1413 (2005)
Published online: 30 October 2005 | doi:10.1038/nbt1154

Magnetic resonance tracking of dendritic cells in melanoma patients for monitoring of cellular therapy

I Jolanda M de Vries1,2, W Joost Lesterhuis3, Jelle O Barentsz4, Pauline Verdijk1, J Han van Krieken5, Otto C Boerman6, Wim J G Oyen6, Johannes J Bonenkamp7, Jan B Boezeman8, Gosse J Adema1, Jeff W M Bulte9, Tom W J Scheenen4, Cornelis J A Punt3, Arend Heerschap4 & Carl G Figdor1


The success of cellular therapies will depend in part on accurate delivery of cells to target organs. In dendritic cell therapy, in particular, delivery and subsequent migration of cells to regional lymph nodes is essential for effective stimulation of the immune system. We show here that in vivo magnetic resonance tracking of magnetically labeled cells is feasible in humans for detecting very low numbers of dendritic cells in conjunction with detailed anatomical information. Autologous dendritic cells were labeled with a clinical superparamagnetic iron oxide formulation or 111In-oxine and were co-injected intranodally in melanoma patients under ultrasound guidance. In contrast to scintigraphic imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allowed assessment of the accuracy of dendritic cell delivery and of inter- and intra-nodal cell migration patterns. MRI cell tracking using iron oxides appears clinically safe and well suited to monitor cellular therapy in humans.

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  1. Department of Tumor Immunology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center and Nijmegen Center for Molecular Life Sciences, Geert Grooteplein 28, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
  2. Department of Pediatric Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center and Nijmegen Center for Molecular Life Sciences, Geert Grooteplein 28, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
  3. Department of Medical Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center and Nijmegen Center for Molecular Life Sciences, Geert Grooteplein 28, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
  4. Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center and Nijmegen Center for Molecular Life Sciences, Geert Grooteplein 28, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
  5. Department of Pathology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center and Nijmegen Center for Molecular Life Sciences, Geert Grooteplein 28, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
  6. Department of Nuclear Medicine, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center and Nijmegen Center for Molecular Life Sciences, Geert Grooteplein 28, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
  7. Department of Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center and Nijmegen Center for Molecular Life Sciences, Geert Grooteplein 28, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
  8. Central Hematological Laboratory, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center and Nijmegen Center for Molecular Life Sciences, Geert Grooteplein 28, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
  9. The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Division of MR Research, and Institute for Cell Engineering, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 217 Traylor, 720 Rutland Ave., Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA.

Correspondence to: Carl G Figdor1 e-mail: c.figdor@ncmls.ru.nl

Correspondence to: Jeff W M Bulte9 e-mail: jwmbulte@mri.jhu.edu



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