Editorials

  • Editorial |

    In the post-Brexit era, Britain must rapidly harmonize national and European law, secure unfettered access to global talent and address funding shortfalls to ensure continued leadership in the life sciences.

  • Editorial |

    The US Food and Drug Administration is sticking to its plan to carry out mandatory premarket review of all gene-edited livestock, irrespective of trait risk. It should rethink.

  • Editorial |

    Was the public re-release of data excerpts from an unpublished manuscript on human germline gene editing ethically justified?

  • Editorial |

    150 years after its founding, Nature has not only published some of biotech’s seminal papers, but also profoundly influenced the sector’s impact on society.

  • Editorial |

    China is set to challenge the pre-eminence of the US drug market. If it can address gaps in its R&D ecosystem and clinical infrastructure, it may even become a home for biotech innovators.

  • Editorial |

    To capitalize on progress in neuromodulation, funders and clinicians should promote not only translational research, but also data sharing.

  • Editorial |

    Heavy-handed targeting of ethnic Chinese researchers, students and investors by US funding, intelligence and immigration agencies poses a threat to the American life-sciences sector.

  • Editorial |

    Sky-high-priced gene therapies face slow uptake and market failure unless healthcare payers and drug makers can find common ground in ‘pay-for-performance’ reimbursement.

  • Editorial |

    Nature Biotechnology’s peer review trial with Code Ocean highlights the importance of ‘containers’ in enhancing software usability, reproducibility and code-writing in academia.

  • Editorial |

    The outgoing FDA commissioner’s comments on the slow integration of data from mobile platforms into clinical research highlight the challenges facing real-world applications of wearables.

  • Editorial |

    Biomedical research and healthcare has traditionally centered on disease rather than health. Several projects gathering data on healthy people promise to change that.

  • Editorial |

    The acquisition of Celgene is bad news for young biotech companies with innovative products and platforms to sell.

  • Editorial |

    The CRISPR baby furor is a clarion call to scientific and government bodies to define acceptable candidate diseases and minimal technical requirements for germline gene editing and to redouble outreach to, and oversight of, IVF clinics.

  • Editorial |

    The work of the 2018 Nobel Prize Chemistry awardees is remarkable not only for its influence on modern biotech, but also for the rapidity with which it translated to commercial products.

  • Editorial |

    The biotech community's decision to speak out in defense of freedom of the press is also a reaffirmation of core principles essential for the sector's success.

  • Editorial |

    Despite spooking investors, new insights into DNA repair and the CRISPR gene-editing system are part and parcel of its progress from research tool to human therapy.

  • Editorial |

    Addressing the commercial failure of the antibiotic market should be a priority for governments seeking to encourage development of new drugs against resistant bugs.

  • Editorial |

    Contrary to alarmist headlines, the DIYbio movement is an unlikely biosecurity threat.

  • Editorial |

    With a massive expansion in healthcare coverage, biotech's next big boom could occur in India. But this revolution will not be globalized—it will be about serving national needs.

  • Editorial |

    Ultra-long read, single-molecule nanopore sequencers are beginning to find an expanding set of research applications in both human genomics and pathogenomics.

  • Editorial |

    A new venture from Amazon, JP Morgans and Berkshire Hathaway has US healthcare in its crosshairs. It may also offer opportunities for innovators in health IT and digital medicine.

  • Editorial |

    The UK government's strategic plan for the life sciences is short on ambition and capital.

  • Editorial |

    This journal supports preprints as a means to rapidly share research, but discourages their use as stand-alone citations disclosing a new method integral to the key results in a paper.

  • Editorial |

    Of the germline engineering approaches, mitochondrial replacement, rather than gene editing, is poised to have the greatest impact on our lives.

  • Editorial |

    Although Kymriah's approval represents a landmark for chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CAR-T) therapy in B-cell malignancies, solid tumors remain a formidable challenge.

  • Editorial |

    Funders need to pay more attention to research aimed at increasing the shelf life of human organs. Doing so could pay dividends for both transplantation and basic research.

  • Editorial |

    Retraction of a study claiming gene editing via an Argonaute enzyme illustrates the importance of post-publication peer review in the age of 24/7 media.

  • Editorial |

    Digital medicine's extraordinary ability to communicate with patients, especially in under-served communities, could help reorient the biotech industry to better address aging and its associated diseases.

  • Editorial |

    Bedside production of protein drugs could help payers by lowering drug prices. It may ultimately lead to individualized treatments.

  • Editorial |

    The hegemony of the CRISPR system as a gene-editing therapy is not as assured as its use as a tool in basic research.

  • Editorial |

    Should a cell therapy for heart disease with scant evidence of efficacy continue to be tested in humans?

  • Editorial |

    RNA-based therapeutics are poised to become successful commercial products, but wide adoption across the biopharmaceutical industry will likely take a few more years.

  • Editorial |

    Nature Biotechnology now requires data availability statements to be supplied with research papers.

  • Editorial |

    Provisions in the 21st Century Cures Act related to leadership at the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) may spell trouble ahead.

  • Editorial |

    Despite an increasingly strident outcry against drug prices in the United States, manufacturers likely face an evolution in the reimbursement landscape, rather than a revolution.

  • Editorial |

    The US Food and Drug Administration approved a muscular-dystrophy drug against the scientific advice of its own staff and advisors. Despite leadership's attempts to downplay the controversy, doubts now surround standards for accelerated approval.

  • Editorial |

    Microbiologists are poised to embrace heterogeneity through the use of single-cell technologies.

  • Editorial |

    Although a US law mandating disclosure of GM ingredients provides food companies with a way out of the labeling rabbit hole, appeasing the anti-GM movement will likely backfire.

  • Editorial |

    The rapid growth of private clinics touting unproven stem cell therapies warrants increased regulatory scrutiny and better tracking of patient outcomes.

  • Editorial |

    Following the bombshell UK vote to leave the EU, Nature Biotechnology offers some cheer to the UK's former life sciences chief, George Freeman.

  • Editorial |

    Headlines about a proposal to engineer an entirely synthetic human genome largely missed the point.