• Nature PastCast

    19 September 2013

    • In this episode:

      • 00:00

        September 1963: The earth moves

        Earthquakes, volcanoes, the formation of mountains - we understand all these phenomena in terms of plate tectonics: large-scale movements of the earth’s crust. But when a German geologist first suggested that continents move, people dismissed it as a wild idea. In this podcast, we hear how a ‘wild idea’ became the unifying theory of earth sciences. Data from the sea floor was key; it showed that the floor was spreading, which was pushing continents apart. Fred Vine recalls the reaction when he published this idea in Nature.

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