to Nature home page
home
search






Nature19 February 2004

 nature highlights

Neural stem cells: A unique population of adult human astrocytes

Nature cover 19 February 2004

In adult rodents, one region of the brain, the subventricular zone, generates thousands of neurons every day. These cells migrate to the olfactory bulb to replace interneurons there. If the adult human brain contains a similarly productive region, there could be important implications for future developments in neuroregenerative therapy. A ribbon of astrocytes with stem cell potential has now been identified along the walls of the lateral ventricle of the adult human brain. The cover shows a reconstruction of the skull and brain, based on computed tomography, indicating regions of the subventricular zone where these stem cells are found. Unlike the stem cell progeny of the rodent brain, the young human neurons do not find their way to the olfactory bulb, so their precise function is not yet clear.

letters to nature
Unique astrocyte ribbon in adult human brain contains neural stem cells but lacks chain migration
NADER SANAI, ANTHONY D. TRAMONTIN, ALFREDO QUI�ONES-HINOJOSA, NICHOLAS M. BARBARO, NALIN GUPTA, SANDEEP KUNWAR, MICHAEL T. LAWTON, MICHAEL W. MCDERMOTT, ANDREW T. PARSA, JOS� MANUEL-GARC�A VERDUGO, MITCHEL S. BERGER & ARTURO ALVAREZ-BUYLLA
Nature 427, 740–744 (2004); doi:10.1038/nature02301
| First Paragraph | Full Text (HTML / PDF) |

news and views
Neuroscience: Immigration denied
PASKO RAKIC
The adult human brain cannot replace lost neurons. This might be because it is reluctant to accept newcomers into an already established neural network, rather than because potential progenitors are absent.
Nature 427, 685–686 (2004); doi:10.1038/427685a
| Full Text (HTML / PDF) |

19 February 2004 table of contents

  
  © 2004 Nature Publishing Group