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Nature15 May 2003

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Genomics: Beyond comparison

Comparative genomics has the potential to tackle a central problem in current biological research: the identification of the functional information in the genome. The results of one of the first major contributions to comparative genomics suggest that the technique is extremely powerful and will have a major impact on genome analysis in all species including humans. Draft sequences of three yeasts separated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by up to 20 million years of evolution were compared with the gene sequence of S. cerevisiae. The comparison yields major revisions to the gene catalogue, including elimination of 500 previously annotated genes and the discovery of 50 new ones.

article
Sequencing and comparison of yeast species to identify genes and regulatory elements
MANOLIS KELLIS, NICK PATTERSON, MATTHEW ENDRIZZI, BRUCE BIRREN & ERIC S. LANDER
Nature 423, 241–254 (2003); doi:10.1038/nature01644
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news and views
Genomics: Yeast rises again
STEVEN L. SALZBERG
What's in a genome? The short answer is that you can't really say in detail for any one species until you have the genome sequences of a variety of other species — some closely related, others less so — to compare it with.
Nature 423, 233–234 (2003); doi:10.1038/423233a
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15 May 2003 table of contents

  
  © 2003 Nature Publishing Group