to Nature home page
home
search






Nature6 March 2003

 nature highlights

Spatial perception: Making a scene

The way the brain constructs a mental motion picture from the sequence of stills provided by the visual system is a central concern in the cognitive sciences. When gathering information, our eyes make saccades, or rapid intermittent movements, fixing on different features in the visual field. Niemeier et al. have produced a new model of the 'transsaccadic integration' process by which the brain constructs a representation of the world after each eye movement. On this model, the brain makes a series of computations based on the reliability of different types of sensory information, putting together a coherent picture from the pieces of a virtual jigsaw puzzle. Observed distortions of spatial perception can be explained by the nature of the optimal inference process.

letters to nature
Optimal transsaccadic integration explains distorted spatial perception
MATTHIAS NIEMEIER , J. DOUGLAS CRAWFORD & DOUGLAS B. TWEED
Nature 422, 76–80 (2003); doi:10.1038/nature01439
| First Paragraph | Full Text (HTML / PDF) |

6 March 2003 table of contents

  
  © 2003 Nature Publishing Group