Astronomy

Galaxies caught in cosmic web

Journal name:
Nature
Volume:
528,
Pages:
310–311
Date published:
DOI:
doi:10.1038/528310e
Published online

Astronomers have discovered eight massive young galaxies within what might be a large web of dark matter.

Ordinary matter, including galaxies, is thought to have aggregated along threads of dark matter in the early Universe. But the progenitors of today's galaxies are often shrouded in clouds of dust, making it difficult for astronomers to spot them and test this theory.

Hideki Umehata at the European Southern Observatory in Garching, Germany, and his colleagues used the high-resolution Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array in Chile to make detailed observations of a narrow slice of the sky. They compared their results with previous surveys of the region to find the galaxies, which were more than 3.4 billion parsecs (11 billion light years) away and producing hundreds of millions of new stars each year.

The study supports the idea that big galaxies form in areas with a high concentration of dark matter.

Astrophys. J. Lett. 815, L8 (2015)

Comments

  1. Report this comment #67419

    Ronald Schleyer said:

    Since no one has the slightest idea of what is meant by the oft-repeated phrase "dark matter," it seems scientifically unwise to speak of it as a definite cause of anything. There are astrophysical data to be explained. The explanation here may be "dark matter" or it may involve certain theoretical deficiencies in the reigning theory of gravitation. Perhaps the observations themselves are erroneous. All possibilities should be kept open.

  2. Report this comment #67421

    Ronald Schleyer said:

    Since no one has the slightest idea of what is meant by the oft-repeated phrase "dark matter," it seems scientifically unwise to speak of it as a definite cause of anything. There are astrophysical data to be explained. The explanation may be "dark matter" or it may involve certain theoretical deficiencies in the reigning theory of gravitation. Perhaps the observations themselves are erroneous. All possibilities should be kept open.

  3. Report this comment #67423

    Ronald Schleyer said:

    Since no one has the slightest idea of what is meant by the oft-repeated phrase "dark matter," it seems scientifically unwise to speak of it as a definite cause of anything. There are astrophysical data to be explained. The explanation may be "dark matter" or it may involve certain theoretical deficiencies in the reigning theory of gravitation. Perhaps the observations themselves are erroneous. All possibilities should be kept open.

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