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  1. Posted on: 07 January 2015

    Study backs argument Keystone would contribute to climate change

    Analysis of fossil fuel reserves suggests most of the oil the pipeline is meant to carry would need to remain in the ground to meet goal of limiting global warming to two degrees

    The Globe and Mail
  2. Posted on: 07 January 2015

    Leave coal, oil in ground for climate's sake

    The Middle East must leave 40 percent of its oil reserves in the ground, and China, the US and Russia most of their coal if global warming is to be curbed, researchers said Wednesday.

    Yahoo! News
  3. Posted on: 07 January 2015

    Climate science Unburnable fossilfuel reserves

    How much more of Earth's fossil fuels can we extract and burn in the short to mediumterm future and still avoid severe global warming A model provides the answer and shows where these 'unburnable' reserves are. See Letter p.187

    Bioportfolio
  4. Posted on: 08 January 2015

    Stable climate demands most fossil fuels stay in the ground, but whose?

    Study estimates how much each country can produce.

    Arstechnica
  5. Posted on: 08 January 2015

    Much of world's fossil fuel reserve must stay buried to prevent climate change, study says

    New research is first to identify which reserves must not be burned to keep global temperature rise under 2C, including over 90% of US and Australian coal and almost all Canadian tar sands (from the Guardian )

    Environmental Research Web
  6. Posted on: 07 January 2015

    Much of world's fossil fuel reserve must stay buried to prevent climate change, study says

    New research is first to identify which reserves must not be burned to keep global temperature rise under 2C, including over 90% of US and Australian coal and almost all Canadian tar sands • George Monbiot: Why leaving fossil fuels in the ground is good fo

    The Guardian
  7. Posted on: 04 March 2015

    We will never again have as much energy as now – it's time to adapt

    Wind energy will be an important part of the world's energy future - but it won't be enough to feed growing demand. David Clarke/Flickr , CC BY-NC-ND In the year 1800, the world used only about 10 million tonnes of coal – renewable energy, mainly biomass,

    The Conversation
  8. Posted on: 26 May 2015

    The Earth League: A Call for Science-Based Action

    Prince Charles (centre) and John Schellnhuber (first row, far right) with participants of St. James' Palace Nobel Laureate Symposium in May 2009. In the 1990s, governments changed their policies towards dealing with damage to the ozone layer -- a shift wid

    Huffington Post

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