Protein–protein interactions: Interactome under construction

Journal name:
Nature
Volume:
468,
Pages:
851–854
Date published:
DOI:
doi:10.1038/468851a
Published online

Developing techniques are helping researchers to build the protein interaction networks that underlie all cell functions.

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Affiliations

  1. Laura Bonetta is a freelance science writer based in Garrett Park, Maryland.

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Comments

  1. Report this comment #16623

    Siyuan Zheng said:

    One of the most interesting points of protein-protein interaction data is that it provides a highly confident framework of gene associations. Within this framework, people can integrate heterogeneous data, adding dynamics to the network.
    For human interactome, the size should be much more than 100,000. The current PINA database contains ~50,000 binary interactions, just by combining several databases.

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