TABLE 1 

From the following article:

Common sense for our genomes

Steven E. Brenner

Nature 449, 783-784(18 October 2007)

doi:10.1038/449783a

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Table 1. Some existing sources for interpreting human genomes.

NameWebsiteBrief descriptionRestrictions on use

A more comprehensive list is compiled by Rania Horaitis and available on the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) website at http://www.hgvs.org/dblist/dblist.html

dbSNPhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/SNP/Repository for short nucleotide polymorphismsNone
OMIM, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Manhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?db=OMIMCatalogue of 18,000 essays on human genes and genetic disordersLicence for commercial use or redistribution
dbGaPhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?db=gapMainly a database from genome-wide association studiesNone on open data, some on personal
SNPediahttp://www.snpedia.comWikipedia-style site for single-nucleotide polymorphismsNone
HGMD, Human Gene Mutation Databasehttp://www.hgmd.cf.ac.uk/ac/index.phpCatalogue of gene mutations responsible for human inherited diseaseFee-based for full access; no redistribution
GeneTestshttp://www.genetests.org/Summarizes more than 1,000 diagnostic genetic testsNone with proper attribution
PharmGKBhttp://www.pharmgkb.org/Pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics knowledgebaseSome privacy restrictions
Locus Specific Mutation Databaseshttp://www.hgvs.org/dblist/glsdb.htmlLists over 600 locus specific databasesSome copyright restrictions
SIFThttp://blocks.fhcrc.org/sift/SIFT.htmlSoftware predicting sequence effects on protein functionNone with proper attribution
SNPs3Dhttp://www.snps3d.orgWebsite that predicts phenotypic impact of SNPsSoftware not downloadable
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