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Editorials

Parallel worlds galore p1

The 50th anniversary of an astonishing scientific hypothesis deserves celebration. So too do the truly astounding tales of a literary genre that anticipated it.

doi:10.1038/448001a

See also: Editor's summary


Enough talk already p1

Governments should act on researchers' attempts to engage the public over nanotechnology.

doi:10.1038/448001b


Discriminating on genes p2

The United States is belatedly establishing necessary protections in law. Others, take note.

doi:10.1038/448002a


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Research Highlights

Research highlights p4

doi:10.1038/448004a


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News

The petaflop challenge p6

Future supercomputers could leave scientists scrabbling for software.

Declan Butler

doi:10.1038/448006a


UK science reshuffled p7

New minister, new ministry.

Katharine Sanderson

doi:10.1038/448007a


No solar hiding place for greenhouse sceptics p8

Sun not to blame for global warming.

Quirin Schiermeier

doi:10.1038/448008a


Cosmic-ray results auger well for future p8

Physicists excited by initial findings.

Jenny Hogan

doi:10.1038/448008b


The great gig in the South p9

Live Earth unleashes its Antarctic monkeys.

Katharine Sanderson

doi:10.1038/448009a


Sidelines p10

doi:10.1038/448010a


Faster still and faster p10

Gene-sequencing advances drive rapid progress.

Erika Check

doi:10.1038/448010b


War of words erupts over fossil dig p12

Researchers clash over access to Olduvai Gorge.

Rex Dalton

doi:10.1038/448012a


News in brief p13

doi:10.1038/448013a


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Business

Abbott's AIDS fight-back p14

Most drug companies have tried to avoid making enemies of AIDS activist groups. But Abbott Laboratories' patience has snapped, as Erika Check reports.

doi:10.1038/448014a


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News Features

Many worlds: See me here, see me there p15

Fifty years ago, a physics student dissatisfied with the standard view of quantum mechanics came up with a radical new interpretation. Mark Buchanan reports on the ensuing debate.

doi:10.1038/448015a

See also: Editor's summary


The biologists strike back p18

Time machines, spaceships, atomic blasters — the icons of science fiction tend to come from the physical sciences. But science fiction has a biological side too, finding drama and pathos in everything from alien evolution to the paradoxes of consciousness. Nature brought together four science-fiction writers with a background in the biological sciences to talk about life-science fiction.

doi:10.1038/448018a

See also: Editor's summary


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Correspondence

Not so good when 75% of grant applications fail p22

Philip Strange

doi:10.1038/448022a


Admission that intelligent design is a religious view p22

H. A. Lessios

doi:10.1038/448022b


Terrorists are activists who renounce non-violence p22

Sarah Reichard, Thomas M. Hinckley & H. D. Bradshaw, Jr

doi:10.1038/448022c


Activists: arson risks killing innocent people p22

Mike Fainzilber

doi:10.1038/448022d


Activists: some walls are not meant to be breached p22

Beverly E. Barton

doi:10.1038/448022e


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Commentary

Many lives in many worlds p23

Accepting quantum physics to be universally true, argues Max Tegmark, means that you should also believe in parallel universes.

doi:10.1038/448023a

See also: Editor's summary


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Books and Arts

Surfing the multiverse p25

The 'many worlds' of quantum mechanics spawned many more of science fiction.

Gary Wolfe

doi:10.1038/448025a

See also: Editor's summary


Exhibition: Art shadowing science p26

Colin Martin reviews Systema metropolis by Mark Dion

doi:10.1038/448026a


Falling victim to balance p27

Timothy Miles reviews Balance: In Search of the Lost Sense by Scot McCredie

doi:10.1038/448027a

See also: Editor's summary


Science with flare p27

Jan Stenflo reviews The Sun Kings: The Unexpected Tragedy of Richard Carrington and the Tale of How Modern Astronomy Began by Stuart Clark

doi:10.1038/448027b


A greener education p28

Peter Hopkinson reviews Degrees that Matter: Climate Change and the University by Ann Rappaport & Sarah Hammond Creighton

doi:10.1038/448028a


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Essay

Concept

Astronomy: A constant surprise p29

Whether ancient or new, in distant galaxies or our own cosmic back-yard, stars have dramatic similarities that hint at remarkably robust formative processes.

John Cowan

doi:10.1038/448029a

See also: Editor's summary


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News and Views

Mars: Ancient fingerprints in the clay p31

The thermodynamics of ancient clays on Mars seems inconsistent with the idea that a thick atmosphere of carbon dioxide caused a warm, wet era in the planet's early history. What did cause it remains an enigma.

David C. Catling

doi:10.1038/448031a

See also: Editor's summary


Synthetic biology: Designs for life p32

The genome of one bacterium has been successfully replaced with that of a different bacterium, transforming one species into another. This development is a harbinger of whole-genome engineering for practical ends.

Philip Ball

doi:10.1038/448032a


Molecular medicine: Entry granted p33

The inability to efficiently deliver small interfering RNAs to target organs hinders their therapeutic application. So a demonstration of siRNA delivery to a notoriously difficult organ — the brain — is very exciting indeed.

Edouard M. Cantin & John J. Rossi

doi:10.1038/448033a

See also: Editor's summary


Evolutionary biology: Mimicry on the edge p34

The latest turn in studies of mimicry in the animal world involves great tits as predators and almonds as prey. When it comes to being unpalatable, it seems that some mimics may neither flatter nor deceive.

Thomas N. Sherratt

doi:10.1038/448034a

See also: Editor's summary


50 & 100 Years Ago p35

doi:10.1038/448035a


Immunology: How a T cell sees sugar p36

T cells of the immune system recognize lipids, as well as peptides, extending our ideas about such target antigens. A crystal structure of a T-cell receptor docked to antigen shows how a sugar controls lipid recognition.

D. Branch Moody

doi:10.1038/nature05890


Planetary science: Hyperion the sponge p37

Richard Webb

doi:10.1038/448037a

See also: Editor's summary


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Articles

Transvascular delivery of small interfering RNA to the central nervous system p39

Priti Kumar, Haoquan Wu, Jodi L. McBride, Kyeong-Eun Jung, Moon Hee Kim, Beverly L. Davidson, Sang Kyung Lee, Premlata Shankar & N. Manjunath

doi:10.1038/nature05901

See also: Editor's summary | News and Views by Cantin & Rossi


CD1d–lipid-antigen recognition by the semi-invariant NKT T-cell receptor p44

Natalie A. Borg, Kwok S. Wun, Lars Kjer-Nielsen, Matthew C. J. Wilce, Daniel G. Pellicci, Ruide Koh, Gurdyal S. Besra, Mandvi Bharadwaj, Dale I. Godfrey, James McCluskey & Jamie Rossjohn

doi:10.1038/nature05907

See also: News and Views by Moody


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Letters

Hyperion's sponge-like appearance p50

P. C. Thomas, J. W. Armstrong, S. W. Asmar, J. A. Burns, T. Denk, B. Giese, P. Helfenstein, L. Iess, T. V. Johnson, A. McEwen, L. Nicolaisen, C. Porco, N. Rappaport, J. Richardson, L. Somenzi, P. Tortora, E. P. Turtle & J. Veverka

doi:10.1038/nature05779

See also: Editor's summary | News and Views by Webb


Surface composition of Hyperion p54

D. P. Cruikshank, J. B. Dalton, C. M. Dalle Ore, J. Bauer, K. Stephan, G. Filacchione, A. R. Hendrix, C. J. Hansen, A. Coradini, P. Cerroni, F. Tosi, F. Capaccioni, R. Jaumann, B. J. Buratti, R. N. Clark, R. H. Brown, R. M. Nelson, T. B. McCord, K. H. Baines, P. D. Nicholson, C. Sotin, A. W. Meyer, G. Bellucci, M. Combes, J.-P. Bibring, Y. Langevin, B. Sicardy, D. L. Matson, V. Formisano, P. Drossart & V. Mennella

doi:10.1038/nature05948

See also: Editor's summary | News and Views by Webb


Low-energy acoustic plasmons at metal surfaces p57

Bogdan Diaconescu, Karsten Pohl, Luca Vattuone, Letizia Savio, Philip Hofmann, Vyacheslav M. Silkin, Jose M. Pitarke, Eugene V. Chulkov, Pedro M. Echenique, Daniel Farías & Mario Rocca

doi:10.1038/nature05975

See also: Editor's summary


Early geochemical environment of Mars as determined from thermodynamics of phyllosilicates p60

Vincent Chevrier, Francois Poulet & Jean-Pierre Bibring

doi:10.1038/nature05961

See also: Editor's summary | News and Views by Catling


Co-mimics have a mutualistic relationship despite unequal defences p64

Hannah M. Rowland, Eira Ihalainen, Leena Lindström, Johanna Mappes & Michael P. Speed

doi:10.1038/nature05899

See also: Editor's summary | News and Views by Sherratt


Mutation of FIG4 causes neurodegeneration in the pale tremor mouse and patients with CMT4J p68

Clement Y. Chow, Yanling Zhang, James J. Dowling, Natsuko Jin, Maja Adamska, Kensuke Shiga, Kinga Szigeti, Michael E. Shy, Jun Li, Xuebao Zhang, James R. Lupski, Lois S. Weisman & Miriam H. Meisler

doi:10.1038/nature05876

See also: Editor's summary


Novel neurotrophic factor CDNF protects and rescues midbrain dopamine neurons in vivo p73

Päivi Lindholm, Merja H. Voutilainen, Juha Laurén, Johan Peränen, Veli-Matti Leppänen, Jaan-Olle Andressoo, Maria Lindahl, Sanna Janhunen, Nisse Kalkkinen, Tõnis Timmusk, Raimo K. Tuominen & Mart Saarma

doi:10.1038/nature05957

See also: Editor's summary


TRIC channels are essential for Ca2+ handling in intracellular stores p78

Masayuki Yazawa, Christopher Ferrante, Jue Feng, Kazuhiro Mio, Toshihiko Ogura, Miao Zhang, Pei-Hui Lin, Zui Pan, Shinji Komazaki, Kazuhiro Kato, Miyuki Nishi, Xiaoli Zhao, Noah Weisleder, Chikara Sato, Jianjie Ma & Hiroshi Takeshima

doi:10.1038/nature05928


Intronic microRNA precursors that bypass Drosha processing p83

J. Graham Ruby, Calvin H. Jan & David P. Bartel

doi:10.1038/nature05983


Crystal structures of histone demethylase JMJD2A reveal basis for substrate specificity p87

Stanley S. Ng, Kathryn L. Kavanagh, Michael A. McDonough, Danica Butler, Ewa S. Pilka, Benoit M. R. Lienard, James E. Bray, Pavel Savitsky, Opher Gileadi, Frank von Delft, Nathan R. Rose, John Offer, Johanna C. Scheinost, Tomasz Borowski, Michael Sundstrom, Christopher J. Schofield & Udo Oppermann

doi:10.1038/nature05971


Structural snapshots along the reaction pathway of ferredoxin–thioredoxin reductase p92

Shaodong Dai, Rosmarie Friemann, Dominique A. Glauser, Florence Bourquin, Wanda Manieri, Peter Schürmann & Hans Eklund

doi:10.1038/nature05937


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Naturejobs

Prospect

Prospects p97

Getting under-represented groups into science is still a work in progress.

Gene Russo

doi:10.1038/nj7149-097a


Special Reports

Beyond the glass ceiling p98

Women and under-represented minorities are earning historically high numbers of science doctorates in the United States. So why aren't they making it to the professorial ranks? Kendall Powell investigates.

Kendall Powell

doi:10.1038/nj7149-098a


Closing the gender gap p101

Across Europe, women in science are typically outnumbered by men at every level. Magdalena Wutte explores how institutions, networking organizations and women themselves can help correct the imbalance.

Magdalena Wutte

doi:10.1038/nj7149-101a


Highlights

Opportunities: The National Institutes of Health

doi:10.1038/nj0164


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Futures

Olympic talent p104

Fit...for nothing?

Richard A. Lovett

doi:10.1038/448104a

See also: Editor's summary


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