Table of contents


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Editorials

Leading by example p229

The primary safeguard against scientific misconduct is the example set every day by thousands of senior researchers in the laboratory.

doi:10.1038/445229a


The database revolution p229

Funding agencies face conflicting challenges in supporting the databases essential to modern biology.

doi:10.1038/445229b


Capitol calling p230

A fresh perspective on science and politics.

doi:10.1038/445230a


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Research Highlights

Research highlights p232

doi:10.1038/445232a


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News

Europe moves to secure its future energy supply p234

Commission proposes common policy to tackle climate change.

Quirin Schiermeier

doi:10.1038/445234a


Palaeontology journal will 'fuel black market' p234

Academics say published fossil finds should be available for study.

Michael Hopkin

doi:10.1038/445234b


Concern as revived 1918 flu virus kills monkeys p237

Questions raised over safety of revived microbe.

Kerri Smith

doi:10.1038/445237a


Sidelines p237

doi:10.1038/445237b


Behind the hunt for the Higgs boson p239

Race to find elusive particle steps up a gear.

Jenny Hogan

doi:10.1038/445239a


Misconduct? It's all academic... p240

The legal quagmire, strain and bad press of misconduct investigations leave many universities tempted to ignore misconduct allegations. But getting an investigation right can reduce the pain and boost an institution's reputation, says Geoff Brumfiel.

doi:10.1038/445240a


Breeding cheats p242

Understanding the social and psychological factors behind scientific misconduct will enable bad practice to be minimized, but never eliminated, says Jim Giles.

doi:10.1038/445242a


Where are they now? p244

Nature catches up with some past fraud investigations — and finds that, whether researchers are found to be guilty or innocent, the wounds are slow to heal.

Lucy Odling-Smee, Jim Giles, Ichiko Fuyuno, David Cyranoski and Emma Marris

doi:10.1038/445244a


News in brief p247

doi:10.1038/445247a


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Column

Party of One: Climate of opportunity p248

With the shift of power in the US Congress comes an chance to re-engage in the debate over climate change. But the process will not be simple, says our new columnist David Goldston.

David Goldston

doi:10.1038/445248a


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Business

Turning back the clock p249

Technology companies across the United States are under investigation for manipulating the timing of their bosses' stock options. Heidi Ledford reports.

doi:10.1038/445249a


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News Features

Biological robotics: Working out the bugs p250

Programming a robot to think like an insect is tough, finds Alison Abbott, but it could help breed machines as manoeuvrable as flies.

doi:10.1038/445250a

See also: Editor's summary


Statistics: Conviction by numbers p254

Statistics have the power to trip everyone up — including judges and juries. Even when extra care is taken to get the numbers right in court, confusion often reigns. Mark Buchanan reports.

doi:10.1038/445254a


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Correspondence

How a database of nuclear databases could help the effort to combat trafficking p256

Klaus Luetzenkirchen and Klaus Mayer

doi:10.1038/445256a


Time to give due weight to the 'carbon footprint' issue p256

Geoffrey Hammond

doi:10.1038/445256b


Moon and Venus as worthy of exploration as Mars p256

Curt Covey

doi:10.1038/445256c


Need to speak English puts burden on Asian scientists p256

Ian Smith

doi:10.1038/445256d


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Commentaries

Merging and emerging cohorts: Not worth the wait p257

How best to study the effects of genes and environment on US health? In the first of two commentaries, Walter C. Willett and his co-authors argue that investing in existing studies is the most efficient approach.

doi:10.1038/445257a

See also: Editor's summary


Merging and emerging cohorts: Necessary but not sufficient p259

doi:10.1038/445259a

See also: Editor's summary


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Books and Arts

Social outcasts p261

The most commonly studied social insects are the Hymenoptera, but what about all the rest?

Jenai M. Milliser and George W. Uetz review The Other Insect Societies by James T. Costa

doi:10.1038/445261a


Beyond fractals p262

J. R. Mureika reviews Superfractals: Patterns of Nature by Michael F. Barnsley

doi:10.1038/445262a


Heady days in Princeton p263

John Stachel reviews Pursuit of Genius: Flexner, Einstein, and the Early Faculty at the Institute for Advanced Study by Steve Batterson

doi:10.1038/445263a


Display elements p263

Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent reviews The Periodic Table: Its Story And Its SignificanceEric M. Scerri

doi:10.1038/445263b


Science in culture p264

Vija Celmins' graphite and charcoal drawings are inspired by the natural world.

Colin Martin

doi:10.1038/445264a


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Essay

Concept

Galaxy Morphology: Out of order p265

Recent observations of vast numbers of galaxies may pose problems for the galaxy classification scheme proposed by Edwin Hubble.

Sidney van den Bergh

doi:10.1038/445265a

See also: Editor's summary


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News and Views

Influenza: Fatal immunity and the 1918 virus p267

Innate immune defences are our first line of protection against infection by viruses and are essential in limiting viral disease. But their reaction to the 1918 influenza virus could have been deadly.

Yueh-Ming Loo and Michael Gale, Jr

doi:10.1038/445267a

See also: Editor's summary


Semiconductor electronics: Trapped fast at the gate p268

The speed record for programming organic transistor memory has been shattered. Work is needed on the stability of the memory storage, but it's a promising step towards some novel technological applications.

Gerwin Gelinck

doi:10.1038/445268a


50 & 100 Years Ago p269

doi:10.1038/445269a


Climate change: Lessons from a distant monsoon p270

The burden of global warming falls most heavily on the developing world. A connection forged between the Indian Ocean climate, Asian monsoons and drought in Indonesia makes for an especially bleak outlook for that nation.

Jonathan T. Overpeck and Julia E. Cole

doi:10.1038/445270a

See also: Editor's summary


Polymer chemistry: Sacrificial synthesis p271

The size and uniformity of polymer molecules makes it difficult to modify them at just one selected site. But a single chemical group can be attached at the end of a polymer if part of the starting material is forfeited.

Sébastien Perrier and Xiaosong Wang

doi:10.1038/445271a


Cell biology: A switch for S phase p272

DNA replication is a necessary prelude to the division of a eukaryotic cell. Initiation of this process requires a complex script, involving many proteins: details of one of the main acts now emerge.

Michael Botchan

doi:10.1038/445272a

See also: Editor's summary


Cosmology: The Universe's skeleton sketched p273

The deepest and clearest maps yet of the Universe's skeleton of dark-matter structure present a picture broadly in concord with favoured models — although puzzling discrepancies remain.

Eric V. Linder

doi:10.1038/nature05522

See also: Editor's summary


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Brief Communications Arising

Astrophysics: Quark matter in compact stars? pE7

M. Alford, D. Blaschke, A. Drago, T. Klähn, G. Pagliara and J. Schaffner-Bielich

doi:10.1038/nature05582


Astrophysics: Quark matter in compact stars? (Reply) pE8

F. Özel

doi:10.1038/nature05583


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Articles

Specialized hepatocyte-like cells regulate Drosophila lipid metabolism p275

Eugenio Gutierrez, David Wiggins, Barbara Fielding and Alex P. Gould

doi:10.1038/nature05382

See also: Editor's summary


Phosphorylation of Sld2 and Sld3 by cyclin-dependent kinases promotes DNA replication in budding yeast p281

Philip Zegerman and John F. X. Diffley

doi:10.1038/nature05432

See also: Editor's summary | News and Views by Botchan


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Letters

Dark matter maps reveal cosmic scaffolding p286

Richard Massey, Jason Rhodes, Richard Ellis, Nick Scoville, Alexie Leauthaud, Alexis Finoguenov, Peter Capak, David Bacon, Hervé Aussel, Jean-Paul Kneib, Anton Koekemoer, Henry McCracken, Bahram Mobasher, Sandrine Pires, Alexandre Refregier, Shunji Sasaki, Jean-Luc Starck, Yoshi Taniguchi, Andy Taylor and James Taylor

doi:10.1038/nature05497

See also: Editor's summary | News and Views by Linder


High-temperature metal–organic magnets p291

Rajsapan Jain, Khayrul Kabir, Joe B. Gilroy, Keith A. R. Mitchell, Kin-chung Wong and Robin G. Hicks

doi:10.1038/nature05439

See also: Editor's summary


Reversible stress softening of actin networks p295

Ovijit Chaudhuri, Sapun H. Parekh and Daniel A. Fletcher

doi:10.1038/nature05459

See also: Editor's summary


Seasonal characteristics of the Indian Ocean Dipole during the Holocene epoch p299

Nerilie J. Abram, Michael K. Gagan, Zhengyu Liu, Wahyoe S. Hantoro, Malcolm T. McCulloch and Bambang W. Suwargadi

doi:10.1038/nature05477

See also: Editor's summary | News and Views by Overpeck & Cole


Complex gas hydrate from the Cascadia margin p303

Hailong Lu, Yu-taek Seo, Jong-won Lee, Igor Moudrakovski, John A. Ripmeester, N. Ross Chapman, Richard B. Coffin, Graeme Gardner and John Pohlman

doi:10.1038/nature05463

See also: Editor's summary


A critical ligamentous mechanism in the evolution of avian flight p307

David B. Baier, Stephen M. Gatesy and Farish A. Jenkins

doi:10.1038/nature05435

See also: Editor's summary


Sonic hedgehog function in chondrichthyan fins and the evolution of appendage patterning p311

Randall D. Dahn, Marcus C. Davis, William N. Pappano and Neil H. Shubin

doi:10.1038/nature05436

See also: Editor's summary


Categorization of behavioural sequences in the prefrontal cortex p315

Keisetsu Shima, Masaki Isoda, Hajime Mushiake and Jun Tanji

doi:10.1038/nature05470

See also: Editor's summary


Aberrant innate immune response in lethal infection of macaques with the 1918 influenza virus p319

Darwyn Kobasa, Steven M. Jones, Kyoko Shinya, John C. Kash, John Copps, Hideki Ebihara, Yasuko Hatta, Jin Hyun Kim, Peter Halfmann, Masato Hatta, Friederike Feldmann, Judie B. Alimonti, Lisa Fernando, Yan Li, Michael G. Katze, Heinz Feldmann and Yoshihiro Kawaoka

doi:10.1038/nature05495

See also: Editor's summary | News and Views by Loo & Gale


Toxoplasma co-opts host gene expression by injection of a polymorphic kinase homologue p324

J. P. J. Saeij, S. Coller, J. P. Boyle, M. E. Jerome, M. W. White and J. C. Boothroyd

doi:10.1038/nature05395

See also: Editor's summary


CDK-dependent phosphorylation of Sld2 and Sld3 initiates DNA replication in budding yeast p328

Seiji Tanaka, Toshiko Umemori, Kazuyuki Hirai, Sachiko Muramatsu, Yoichiro Kamimura and Hiroyuki Araki

doi:10.1038/nature05465

See also: News and Views by Botchan


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Naturejobs

Prospect

Prospects p333

Perks beyond pay attract researchers to top employers.

Paul Smaglik

doi:10.1038/nj7125-333a


Special Report

Don't stop me now p334

Unlike their US counterparts, European scientists can be forced to retire while they're still productive. But some in Germany are finding ways to go on. Britta Danger reports.

Britta Danger

doi:10.1038/nj7125-334a


Recruitment

Great expectations p338

You know what you want from a job. But how do you convince an employer that your skills are relevant?

Jens-Peter Mayer

doi:10.1038/nj7125-338a


Highlights

Opportunities: The National Institutes of Health

doi:10.1038/nj0143


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