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Nature 384, 209 - 210 (21 November 1996); doi:10.1038/384209a0

Focus on butterfly eyespot development

H. F. Nijhout

Department of Zoology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708-0325, USA (e-mail:hfn@acpub.duke.edu).

The beautiful eyespot patterns on the wings of butterflies help them to evade predators, but they also present biologists with a unique opportunity to investigate the reciprocal interactions of development and evolution.

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