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Letters to Nature
Nature 214, 903 - 904 (27 May 1967); doi:10.1038/214903a0

Does a Moving Body appear Cool?

P. T. LANDSBERG

Department of Applied Mathematics and Mathematical Physics, University College, Cardiff.

THE question, “Does a moving body appear cool ?”, which I raised in an earlier note, has now received affirmative answers1–3, in agreement with accepted theory4. These answers appeal to the Doppler effect2, and implicitly to the equipartition theorem1,3. In this note a continued reserve towards accepted theory is maintained by attempting to show that neither line of argument enables one to discriminate between accepted theory and the view that temperature can be Lorentz-invariant.

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References

1. Fremlin, J. H., Nature, 213, 277 (1967). | ISI | ChemPort |
2. Noerdlinger, P. D., Nature, 213, 1117 (1967). | ISI |
3. Williams, I. P., Nature, 213, 1118 (1967). | ISI |
4. Einstein, A., Jb. Radioakt., 4, 411 (1907).
5. Rindler, W., Special Relativity, 15 (Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh, 1966).
6. Landsberg, P. T., Nature, 212, 571 (1966). | ISI |
7. Landsberg, P. T., Proc. Phys. Soc., 89, 1007 (1966). | Article | ISI | ChemPort |
8. Tolman, R. C., The Principles of Statistical Mechanics, 97 (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1938).
9. Pauli, W., Theory of Relativity (Pergamon, London, 1958). McCrea, W. H., Relativity Physics (Methuen, London, 1960).



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