Nature 131, 652-653 (06 May 1933) | doi:10.1038/131652b0

Chemical Detection of Artificial Transmutation of Elements

F. A. PANETH &  P. L. GÜNTHER

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IF detection of elements originating from artificial transmutation can be attained by chemical methods, not only will this mean a desirable checking of physical observations, but also new results may thereby be obtained. For physical means of discerning the transmutation of elements—whether by observing scintillations or by electrical methods—presuppose that the atoms which originate are expelled with a certain minimum energy; processes which take place with lesser energy remain at present unknown to us, even although they are perhaps quantitatively more important than the already ascertained cases of artificial disintegration of atoms.

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References

  1. F. Paneth and K. Peters, Z. phys. Chem., 134, 353; 1928. See also NATURE, 123, 879 June 8, 1929; 125, 490, March 29, 1930.
  2. J. N. Collie and W. Ramsay, Proc. Roy. Soc., 59, 257; 1896.
  3. Cf. Z. phys. Chem. (B.), 1, 170, 185; 1928.
  4. J. D. Cockcroft and E. T. S. Walton, Proc. Roy. Soc., 137, 229; 1932. NATURE, 131, 23, Jan. 7, 1933. See also H. Rausch v. Traubenberg A. Eckardt and R. Gebauer, Naturwissenschaften, 21, 26; 1933.
  5. Cf. the earlier, also negative, results, Z. phys. Chem. (B), 1, 180, 182: 1928.
  6. F. Paneth and Wm. D. Urry, Z. phys. Chem. (A), 152, 110; 1931.