Specials archive

  • mRNA splicing: 40 years on

    Pre-mRNA splicing is a fundamental step in mRNA maturation and its discovery in 1977 revolutionized our understanding of gene expression. This collection of reviews and research articles from across the Nature group of journals showcases the latest advances in splicing research and the emerging understanding of the effects of mRNA splicing on cell fate, development, physiology and disease.

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  • 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    Nature Research congratulates the awardees of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry - Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson. Their pioneering work on the use of cryo-electron microscopy to solve high-resolution structures of biomolecules has provided unprecedented insights into the complexity of life. Here, we present a Collection of Research, Methods, Reviews and Comment pieces from Nature Research to celebrate the award.

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  • 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics

    We present this Collection of research, review and comment from Nature Research to celebrate the award of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics to Rainer Weiss, Barry Barish and Kip Thorne - who are recognized "for decisive contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves". The success of LIGO is a testament to their vision, ingenuity and sheer perseverance over several decades.

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  • 2017 Nobel prize in Physiology or Medicine

    The 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young for their elucidation of the molecular mechanisms controlling circadian rhythm. Their pioneering work in Drosophila uncovered the internal oscillators, or clocks, that synchronise cellular metabolism and organismal behaviour to the light/dark cycle to generate biological rhythms with 24 hour periodicity.

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  • Scientific Rigour and Reproducibility

    Science moves forward by corroboration – when researchers verify others’ results. Progress is faster when people waste less time pursuing false leads. No research paper can ever be considered to be the final word, but there are too many that do not stand up to further study.

    There is growing alarm about results that cannot be reproduced. Explanations include increased levels of scrutiny, complexity of experiments and statistics, and pressures on researchers. Journals, scientists, institutions and funders all have a part in tackling reproducibility. Nature has taken substantive steps to improve the transparency and robustness in what we publish, and to promote awareness within the scientific community. We hope that the articles contained in this collection will help.

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  • Nature's Astronomical Highlights

    Nature has an impressive history in publishing significant advances in our knowledge of astronomy and the Universe. This Collection pulls together 40 papers from across the years, including reports of the first exoplanets discovered, the first pulsar, the first quasar and many other landmark discoveries. This is the context in which Nature Astronomy has recently launched, allowing the publication of more top-level astronomical research.

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  • The 3D genome

    This collection showcases both the latest advances in the methodologies used to study genome organization and our emerging understanding of how genome organization and nuclear architecture regulate gene expression, cell fate and cell function in physiology and disease. The collection includes recent Reviews, Research articles and Protocols from across the Nature group of journals.

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  • Volcanoes and Climate

    Both large and small volcanic eruptions can affect climate. This collection explores past climate and ecological changes associated with volcanic activity, as well as the factors that control the climate effects of an eruption.

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  • Targeting 1.5 °C

    This joint Collection reflects on how policy can direct science by showcasing researchers' perspectives on how best to respond to the Paris Agreement aspiration to limit climate change to 1.5 °C above preindustrial levels.

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  • Brexit and science

    The United Kingdom’s vote to leave the European Union has thrown research into uncertainty – affecting jobs, funding and collaborations. As the UK experiences its biggest political upheaval in generations, follow Brexit’s fallout for science here.

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  • Science in China

    Chinese science has been moving at breakneck speed for the past few decades, fuelled by vast infusions of cash and a rapidly growing technical workforce. It now boasts more researchers than the United States, outspends the European Union in research and development and is on track to best all other nations in its yearly production of scientific papers. But there have been bumps along the way. Chinese research has generally had low impact and there have been persistent concerns about quality, which the country is trying to address. This special issue looks at the state of science in China today and the challenges it faces in the future.

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  • Antimicrobial Resistance

    Resistance to antimicrobials threatens to reduce the lifespan of our current arsenal of antimicrobial agents and new drugs are urgently needed. Tackling resistance will require a deep understanding of microbial infections and the mechanisms through which resistance arises, as well as concerted efforts between academia and industry aimed at developing novel antimicrobial agents. This joint Collection describes how antibiotic resistance emerges and details strategies through which new antimicrobial compounds are being discovered.

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  • The Epitranscriptome

    A role for DNA modification in gene regulation is well established, but much less is known about how RNA modification affects RNA fate and influences the way genes are expressed. This web collection features articles from various Nature journals that highlight this exciting new research area of ‘epitranscriptomics’.

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  • Future Generations

    The effects on distant tomorrows of the decisions we make today have never been greater. As we change our planet, ourselves and potentially our descendants, in ever more dramatic ways, this issue of Nature takes stock. Do we have the brains and tools to understand and account for the future and, if not, what should be done?

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  • Gravitational waves

    Einstein published the first papers predicting the existence of gravitational waves — ripples in the fabric of space-time — almost a century ago. Physicists at the recently upgraded Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) are now widely expected to announce that they have measured these cosmic deformations, opening up a new field of gravitational-wave astronomy. Discover Nature’s coverage of the unfolding story and other gravitational-wave experiments, as well as everything you ever wanted to know about Einstein’s general theory of relativity.

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  • Fibrosis: mechanisms and targets

    The collection consists of Reviews and Research articles from several Nature journals, describing the latest advances in fibrosis research in various organs, including the liver, kidney, heart, skin and lung. It also includes relevant News and Opinion articles and additional content, including a selection of peer-reviewed procedures from Nature Protocols, and a PrimeView, which summarizes the main features of systemic sclerosis.

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  • 2015 Paris climate talks

    Nations are meeting in Paris to negotiate an agreement to limit greenhouse-gas emissions. But with 2015 likely to be the hottest year on record, is the 2° world a fantasy? And what will it take for Paris to be a success? The quest for a climate treaty has been 25 years in the making — but only after an agreement is signed will the real business of decarbonization begin. Nature tracks developments during the twenty-first meeting of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change.

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  • Paris climate talks 2015

    The United Nations Climate Talks in Paris, from 30 November to 11 December, have long been framed as the next milestone in the negotiations to limit global warming. Participating countries agreed that the meeting would culminate in a binding strategy for mitigating climate change, to come into effect by 2020. Around 150 countries have already put their pledges on the table. The nations’ promised actions are unlikely to add up to keeping the world from exceeding a global mean surface temperature of 2 oC above pre-industrial levels. But if all countries’ targets are implemented with sufficient oversight, and if the goals are tightened over time, then the world may finally find itself on a path towards a low-carbon economy — rather than moving away from it. In this Collection, we present news, comment, overview and original-research articles that discuss what is at stake at the Paris climate talks, along with the scientific foundations for the negotiations.

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  • Soils and its sustainability

    Healthy and productive soils are central to achieving a number of the sustainable development goals adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations this year. Soils sustain our food systems, filter and regulate the flow of fresh water, store vast amounts of carbon and support myriad organisms. But the world’s soils are increasingly under pressure from climate change, population growth and poor land management. This year is the International Year of Soils, and on the cusp of world soil day, this collection brings together research articles, reviews and opinion pieces that explore the function of soils and their role in shaping the Earth’s environment and human society. Image: Attached.

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  • General relativity at 100

    In November 1915, Albert Einstein put the finishing touches on his radical reinvention of space, time, gravity and the Universe itself. Throughout the following 100 years, experimenters have confirmed the general theory of relativity to ever-higher precision, and theorists have unravelled implications of it that even Einstein had not dreamed of, from black holes to the Big Bang. In this special collection and in a companion e-book, Nature celebrates the past triumphs of Einstein’s creation and the milestones yet to come.

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  • HIV

    This collection combines Reviews and Research articles recently published across several Nature journals and aims to bring renewed attention to the latest developments in HIV research and how they are affecting efforts towards HIV prevention, treatment and cure.

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  • Challenges in irreproducible research

    Science moves forward by corroboration – when researchers verify others’ results. Science advances faster when people waste less time pursuing false leads. No research paper can ever be considered to be the final word, but there are too many that do not stand up to further study.

    There is growing alarm about results that cannot be reproduced. Explanations include increased levels of scrutiny, complexity of experiments and statistics, and pressures on researchers. Journals, scientists, institutions and funders all have a part in tackling reproducibility. Nature has taken substantive steps to improve the transparency and robustness in what we publish, and to promote awareness within the scientific community. We hope that the articles contained in this collection will help.

    View Challenges in irreproducible research special

  • 1,000 Genome Project

    From one genome to 1,000 and beyond, this Nature Collection marks both the 25th anniversary of the Human Genome Project and the final phase of the 1000 Genomes Project. This collection brings together seminal publications from the major human genomics reference projects stemming from the Human Genome Project, which provide foundational open reference catalogues of genetic variation worldwide as a resource to the community. These datasets have enabled studies screening for the genetic basis of disease and provided deep insights into population history and evolution.

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