Journal of Perinatology
SEARCH     advanced search my account e-alerts subscribe register
Journal home
Advance online publication
Current issue
Archive
Press releases
For authors
For referees
Contact editorial office
About the journal
For librarians
Subscribe
Advertising
naturereprints
Contact Springer Nature
Customer services
Site features
NPG Subject areas
Access material from all our publications in your subject area:
Biotechnology Biotechnology
Cancer Cancer
Chemistry Chemistry
Dentistry Dentistry
Development Development
Drug Discovery Drug Discovery
Earth Sciences Earth Sciences
Evolution & Ecology Evolution & Ecology
Genetics Genetics
Immunology Immunology
Materials Materials Science
Medical Research Medical Research
Microbiology Microbiology
Molecular Cell Biology Molecular Cell Biology
Neuroscience Neuroscience
Pharmacology Pharmacology
Physics Physics
Browse all publications
 

December 2000, Volume 20, Number 8s, Pages S105-S112

Table of contents    Previous  Abstract  Next   Article  PDF

Original Article

Facility and Operations Planning for Quiet Hospital Nurseries

Jack B Evans PE1 and M Kathleen Philbin RN PhD2

1Jack Evans and Associates, Inc.

2Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Houston Medical School, Houston, TX

Correspondence to: M. Kathleen Philbin RN , University of Texas, Houston Medical School, 6431 Fannin Street, Room 6.133, Houston, TX 77030.

Abstract

Designs for new construction or facility renovation should incorporate vibration and noise control methods appropriate to the occupants and activities of the proposed space. Noise and vibration are environmental factors within a hospital nursery that can affect infant health and development, staff and parent communications, operational efficiencies, and the fatigue/comfort level of all occupants. Facility noise and vibration levels set a threshold that will be increased by operational noise. It is important, therefore, that hospital administrators, clinicians, and facility managers assure that architects, engineers, and builders use appropriate acoustical design criteria, methods, and materials to control noise and vibration. This article discusses architectural design and construction and recommends criteria for achieving quiet nursery environments. Journal of Perinatology 2000; 20:S105-S112.

December 2000, Volume 20, Number 8s, Pages S105-S112

Table of contents    Previous  Abstract  Next   Article  PDF