Original Article

Journal of Human Hypertension (2007) 21, 297–306. doi:10.1038/sj.jhh.1002138; published online 8 February 2007

Coenzyme Q10 in the treatment of hypertension: a meta-analysis of the clinical trials

F L Rosenfeldt1,2,3, S J Haas4,5, H Krum4,5, A Hadj1,3, K Ng1, J-Y Leong1,3 and G F Watts6

  1. 1Cardiac Surgical Research Unit, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Australia
  2. 2Department of Surgery, Monash University, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Australia
  3. 3Cardiac Surgery Laboratory, Baker Heart Research Institute, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Australia
  4. 4Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, NHMRC Centre of Clinical Research Excellence in Therapeutics, Alfred Hospital, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
  5. 5Department of Medicine, Alfred Hospital, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
  6. 6Department of Medicine and HeartSearch, University of Western Australia, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Australia

Correspondence: Professor FL Rosenfeldt, Cardiac Surgical Research Unit, Alfred Hospital, PO Box 315, Prahran, Victoria 3181, Australia. E-mail: f.rosenfeldt@alfred.org.au or rosenfeldt@bigpond.com

Received 22 May 2006; Revised 6 October 2006; Accepted 14 November 2006; Published online 8 February 2007.

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Abstract

Our objective was to review all published trials of coenzyme Q10 for hypertension, assess overall efficacy and consistency of therapeutic action and side effect incidence. Meta-analysis was performed in 12 clinical trials (362 patients) comprising three randomized controlled trials, one crossover study and eight open label studies. In the randomized controlled trials (n=120), systolic blood pressure in the treatment group was 167.7 (95% confidence interval, CI: 163.7–171.1) mm Hg before, and 151.1 (147.1–155.1) mm Hg after treatment, a decrease of 16.6 (12.6–20.6, P<0.001) mm Hg, with no significant change in the placebo group. Diastolic blood pressure in the treatment group was 103 (101–105) mm Hg before, and 94.8 (92.8–96.8) mm Hg after treatment, a decrease of 8.2 (6.2–10.2, P<0.001) mm Hg, with no significant change in the placebo group. In the crossover study (n=18), systolic blood pressure decreased by 11 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure by 8 mm Hg (P<0.001) with no significant change with placebo. In the open label studies (n=214), mean systolic blood pressure was 162 (158.4–165.7) mm Hg before, and 148.6 (145–152.2) mm Hg after treatment, a decrease of 13.5 (9.8–17.1, P<0.001) mm Hg. Mean diastolic blood pressure was 97.1 (95.2–99.1) mm Hg before, and 86.8 (84.9–88.8) mm Hg after treatment, a decrease of 10.3 (8.4–12.3, P<0.001) mm Hg. We conclude that coenzyme Q10 has the potential in hypertensive patients to lower systolic blood pressure by up to 17 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure by up to 10 mm Hg without significant side effects.

Keywords:

Coenzyme Q10, blood pressure, therapeutics, meta-analysis

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