Original Article

International Journal of Obesity (2013) 37, 1268–1274; doi:10.1038/ijo.2012.204; published online 11 December 2012

Behavior and Psychology

The associations of anxiety and depression symptoms with weight change and incident obesity: The HUNT Study

B Brumpton1, A Langhammer1, P Romundstad1, Y Chen2 and X-M Mai1

  1. 1Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
  2. 2Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Correspondence: B Brumpton, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU, Det medisinske fakultet, Institutt for Samfunnsmedisin, Level 5, Håkon Jarls Gate 11, Trondheim 7491, Norway. E-mail: ben.brumpton@ntnu.no

Received 3 July 2012; Revised 16 October 2012; Accepted 8 November 2012
Advance online publication 11 December 2012

Top

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

 

To investigate the associations of anxiety and depression symptoms with weight change and incident obesity in men and women.

DESIGN:

 

We conducted a prospective cohort study using the Norwegian Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT).

SUBJECTS:

 

The study cohort included 25180 men and women, 19–55 years of age from the second survey of the HUNT (1995–1997).

MEASUREMENTS:

 

Anxiety and depression symptoms were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Weight change was determined for the study period of an average 11 years. Incident obesity was new-onset obesity classified as having a body mass index of greater than or equal to30.0kgm2 at follow-up. The associations of anxiety or depression with weight change in kilograms (kg) was estimated using linear regression models. Risk ratios (RRs) for incident obesity associated with anxiety or depression were estimated using log-binomial regression.

RESULTS:

 

In men, any anxiety or depression was associated with an average 0.81kg (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.27–1.34) larger weight change after 11 years compared with those without such symptoms (mean weight change: 5.04 versus 4.24kg). Women with any anxiety or depression had an average 0.98kg (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.49–1.47) larger weight change compared with those without such symptoms (mean weight change: 5.02 versus 4.04kg). Participants with any anxiety or depression had a significantly elevated cumulative incidence of obesity (men: RR 1.37, 95% CI 1.13–1.65; women: RR 1.18, 95% CI 1.00–1.40).

CONCLUSION:

 

We found that symptoms of anxiety and depression were associated with larger weight change and an increased cumulative incidence of obesity in both men and women.

Keywords:

anxiety; depression; mental health; prospective; weight change

Extra navigation

.

natureevents

ADVERTISEMENT