International Journal of Obesity
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August 2002, Volume 26, Number 8, Pages 1129-1137
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Paper
Effects of chronic peanut consumption on energy balance and hedonics
C M Alper and R D Mattes

Purdue University, Department of Foods and Nutrition, West-Lafayette, Indiana, USA

Correspondence to: R D Mattes, Professor of Foods and Nutrition, Purdue University, Department of Foods and Nutrition, 1264 Stone Hall, Room 212, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1264, USA. E-mail: mattesr@cfs.purdue.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of chronic peanut consumption on energy balance and hedonics.

DESIGN: Thirty-week, cross-over, intervention study. Participants were provided 2113±494 kJ/day (505±118 kcal/day) as peanuts for 8 weeks with no dietary guidance (free feeding¾FF), 3 weeks with instructions to add peanuts to their customary diet (addition¾ADD) and 8 weeks where peanuts replaced an equal amount of other fats in the diet (substitution¾SUB).

SUBJECTS: Fifteen, healthy, normal-weight (BMI of 23.3±1.8) adults, aged 33±9 y.

MEASUREMENTS: Dietary intake, appetitive indices, energy expenditure, body weight and hedonics.

RESULTS: During FF, peanut consumption elicited a strong compensatory dietary response (ie subjects compensated for 66% of the energy provided by the nuts) and body weight gain (1.0 kg) was significantly lower than predicted (3.6 kg; P<0.01). When customary dietary fat was replaced with the energy from peanuts, energy intake, as well as body weight, were maintained precisely. Participants were unaware that body weight was a research focus. Resting energy expenditure was increased by 11% after regular peanut consumption for 19 weeks (P<0.01). Chronic consumption of peanuts did not lead to a decline in pleasantness or hunger ratings for peanuts nor did it lead to any hedonic shift for selected snack foods with other taste qualities during any of the three treatments.

CONCLUSIONS: Despite being energy dense, peanuts have a high satiety value and chronic ingestion evokes strong dietary compensation and little change in energy balance.

International Journal of Obesity (2002) 26, 1129-1137. doi:10.1038/sj.ijo.0802050

Keywords

peanuts; energy balance; body weight; hedonics

Received 24 May 2001; revised 13 December 2001; accepted 13 March 2002
August 2002, Volume 26, Number 8, Pages 1129-1137
Table of contents    Previous  Abstract  Next   Full text  PDF