Collection

Antimicrobial Resistance

Resistance to antimicrobials is a global problem of increasing importance. Pathogens rapidly develop mutations that render current treatments ineffective. For example, resistance to carbapenems, one of the ‘last lines’ of antibiotics, is widespread and has been observed in numerous countries; resistance to artemisinin, the gold standard in malaria treatment, has also emerged. Our current arsenal of antimicrobial agents thus has a limited lifespan and new drugs are urgently needed. Tackling this resistance will require a deep understanding of microbial infections and the mechanisms through which resistance arises, as well as concerted efforts between academia and industry aimed at developing novel antimicrobial agents.

The content for this site has been chosen by the editors of several Nature journals and the collection of review articles have been made freely available for 6 months, thanks to support from Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ, USA. The editors have also selected a wide range of additional and related content to supplement the collection and provide a comprehensive resource on antimicrobial resistance.

This collection has been produced with support from Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ, USA. As always, Nature Publishing Group retains sole responsibility for all editorial content.

Image © Philip Patenall, Nature Research Group

Collection - Free content

  • Nature Reviews Drug Discovery | Opinion

    Drug resistance is threatening to sideline the currently available antibiotics, and new antibiotics are unlikely to become available before the current arsenal becomes ineffective. Brown proposes the use of approved drugs or neutraceuticals as antibiotic resistance breakers — compounds that could be administered alongside current antibiotics to prolong their useful lifespan — to bridge the gap.

    • David Brown
  • Nature Reviews Microbiology | Opinion

    The failure of antibiotics can arise by different bacterial survival strategies, each with implications for treatment. In this Opinion article, Balaban and colleagues propose a new experimental framework for distinguishing between several forms of resistance, tolerance and persistence to antibiotic treatment.

    • Asher Brauner
    • , Ofer Fridman
    • , Orit Gefen
    •  &  Nathalie Q. Balaban
  • Nature Reviews Drug Discovery | Review

    Infection with HIV-1 is currently incurable as HIV-1 can persist as integrated provirus in the genome of latently infected CD4+ T cells, where it is invisible to the immune system and not responsive to drugs. Here, Ferrari and colleagues discuss the development of novel engineered bispecific and trispecific antibodies, particularly dual-affinity re-targeting (DART) proteins, designed to eradicate latently infected cells.

    • Guido Ferrari
    • , Barton F. Haynes
    • , Scott Koenig
    • , Jeffrey L. Nordstrom
    • , David M. Margolis
    •  &  Georgia D. Tomaras
  • Nature Reviews Microbiology | Review

    Microorganisms produce a wealth of structurally diverse specialized metabolites with great potential for use in medicine and agriculture. In this Review, Rutledge and Challis provide an overview of the approaches that are available to identify and activate cryptic microbial biosynthetic gene clusters, which represent an untapped reservoir of useful metabolites.

    • Peter J. Rutledge
    •  &  Gregory L. Challis
  • Nature Reviews Immunology | Review

    Here, the authors detail our current understanding of specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs), a family of endogenous mediators that have important roles in promoting the resolution of inflammation. With a focus on the lungs, they discuss the contribution of SPMs to infectious and chronic inflammatory diseases and their emerging therapeutic potential.

    • Maria C. Basil
    •  &  Bruce D. Levy

Further reading

  • Nature | Article

    The nasal commensal bacterium Staphylococcus lugdunensis produces a novel cyclic peptide antibiotic, lugdunin, that inhibits colonization by S. aureus in animal models and is associated with a significantly reduced S. aureus carriage rate in humans, suggesting that human commensal bacteria could be a valuable resource for the discovery of new antibiotics.

    • Alexander Zipperer
    • , Martin C. Konnerth
    • , Claudia Laux
    • , Anne Berscheid
    • , Daniela Janek
    • , Christopher Weidenmaier
    • , Marc Burian
    • , Nadine A. Schilling
    • , Christoph Slavetinsky
    • , Matthias Marschal
    • , Matthias Willmann
    • , Hubert Kalbacher
    • , Birgit Schittek
    • , Heike Brötz-Oesterhelt
    • , Stephanie Grond
    • , Andreas Peschel
    •  &  Bernhard Krismer
  • Nature Communications | Article | open

    Antibiotic resistance is common in environmental bacteria, including those living in isolated caves. Here, Pawlowski et al. study one of these bacterial strains, showing that it is resistant to most clinically used antibiotics through a remarkable variety of mechanisms, some of which are new to science.

    • Andrew C. Pawlowski
    • , Wenliang Wang
    • , Kalinka Koteva
    • , Hazel A. Barton
    • , Andrew G. McArthur
    •  &  Gerard D. Wright
  • Nature | Article

    The bicyclic azetidines, a class of potent, well-tolerated antimalarial compounds that is active against multiple stages of the Plasmodium life-cycle, has been discovered following screens against libraries of compounds reminiscent of natural products.

    • Nobutaka Kato
    • , Eamon Comer
    • , Tomoyo Sakata-Kato
    • , Arvind Sharma
    • , Manmohan Sharma
    • , Micah Maetani
    • , Jessica Bastien
    • , Nicolas M. Brancucci
    • , Joshua A. Bittker
    • , Victoria Corey
    • , David Clarke
    • , Emily R. Derbyshire
    • , Gillian L. Dornan
    • , Sandra Duffy
    • , Sean Eckley
    • , Maurice A. Itoe
    • , Karin M. J. Koolen
    • , Timothy A. Lewis
    • , Ping S. Lui
    • , Amanda K. Lukens
    • , Emily Lund
    • , Sandra March
    • , Elamaran Meibalan
    • , Bennett C. Meier
    • , Jacob A. McPhail
    • , Branko Mitasev
    • , Eli L. Moss
    • , Morgane Sayes
    • , Yvonne Van Gessel
    • , Mathias J. Wawer
    • , Takashi Yoshinaga
    • , Anne-Marie Zeeman
    • , Vicky M. Avery
    • , Sangeeta N. Bhatia
    • , John E. Burke
    • , Flaminia Catteruccia
    • , Jon C. Clardy
    • , Paul A. Clemons
    • , Koen J. Dechering
    • , Jeremy R. Duvall
    • , Michael A. Foley
    • , Fabian Gusovsky
    • , Clemens H. M. Kocken
    • , Matthias Marti
    • , Marshall L. Morningstar
    • , Benito Munoz
    • , Daniel E. Neafsey
    • , Amit Sharma
    • , Elizabeth A. Winzeler
    • , Dyann F. Wirth
    • , Christina A. Scherer
    •  &  Stuart L. Schreiber
  • Nature Communications | Article | open

    It is unclear whether new antimalarial compounds may rapidly lose effectiveness in the field because of parasite resistance. Here, Corey et al. investigate the acquisition of drug resistance and the extent to which common resistance mechanisms decrease susceptibility to a diverse set of 50 antimalarial compounds.

    • Victoria C. Corey
    • , Amanda K. Lukens
    • , Eva S. Istvan
    • , Marcus C. S. Lee
    • , Virginia Franco
    • , Pamela Magistrado
    • , Olivia Coburn-Flynn
    • , Tomoyo Sakata-Kato
    • , Olivia Fuchs
    • , Nina F. Gnädig
    • , Greg Goldgof
    • , Maria Linares
    • , Maria G. Gomez-Lorenzo
    • , Cristina De Cózar
    • , Maria Jose Lafuente-Monasterio
    • , Sara Prats
    • , Stephan Meister
    • , Olga Tanaseichuk
    • , Melanie Wree
    • , Yingyao Zhou
    • , Paul A. Willis
    • , Francisco-Javier Gamo
    • , Daniel E. Goldberg
    • , David A. Fidock
    • , Dyann F. Wirth
    •  &  Elizabeth A. Winzeler
  • Nature | Article

    Antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, such as MRSA, are proving increasingly difficult to treat; here, one reason for this is confirmed to be the fact that S. aureus bacteria can reside in intracellular reservoirs where they are protected from antibiotics, but a new strategy—based on an antibody–antibiotic conjugate—can specifically target these reservoirs.

    • Sophie M. Lehar
    • , Thomas Pillow
    • , Min Xu
    • , Leanna Staben
    • , Kimberly K. Kajihara
    • , Richard Vandlen
    • , Laura DePalatis
    • , Helga Raab
    • , Wouter L. Hazenbos
    • , J. Hiroshi Morisaki
    • , Janice Kim
    • , Summer Park
    • , Martine Darwish
    • , Byoung-Chul Lee
    • , Hilda Hernandez
    • , Kelly M. Loyet
    • , Patrick Lupardus
    • , Rina Fong
    • , Donghong Yan
    • , Cecile Chalouni
    • , Elizabeth Luis
    • , Yana Khalfin
    • , Emile Plise
    • , Jonathan Cheong
    • , Joseph P. Lyssikatos
    • , Magnus Strandh
    • , Klaus Koefoed
    • , Peter S. Andersen
    • , John A. Flygare
    • , Man Wah Tan
    • , Eric J. Brown
    •  &  Sanjeev Mariathasan
  • Nature Microbiology | Article

    An undetected, phenotypically colistin-resistant subpopulation of Enterobacter cloacae mediates antibiotic treatment failure

    • Victor I. Band
    • , Emily K. Crispell
    • , Brooke A. Napier
    • , Carmen M. Herrera
    • , Greg K. Tharp
    • , Kranthi Vavikolanu
    • , Jan Pohl
    • , Timothy D. Read
    • , Steven E. Bosinger
    • , M. Stephen Trent
    • , Eileen M. Burd
    •  &  David S. Weiss