Outlook |

Cancer immunotherapy

Drugs that mobilize our immune systems against cancer are dramatically improving care for many people, and research is rapidly moving ahead in the lab and the clinic.

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    In this Perspective, June, Bluestone and Warshauer discuss potential cellular and molecular explanations for the autoimmunity often associated with immunotherapy, and propose additional research and changes to reporting practices to aid efforts to understand and minimize these toxic side effects.

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    The clinical benefit of anti-PD-1 antibody treatment is dependent on the extent to which exhausted CD8 T cells are reinvigorated in relation to the tumour burden of the patient.

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