Bone Marrow Transplantation
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March 1997, Volume 19, Number 5, Pages 455-460
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Allografting
Allogeneic blood stem cell transplantation in advanced hematologic cancers
D Przepiorka1, P Anderlini1, C Ippoliti1, I Khouri1, T Fietz1, P Thall2, R Mehra1, S Giralt1, J Gajewski1, A B Deisseroth1, K Cleary3, R Champlin1, K van Besien1, B Andersson1 and M Körbling1

1Department of Hematology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA

2Department of Biomathematics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA

3Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA

Abstract

Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for advanced hematologic cancer is associated with a high risk of early treatment-related morbidity and mortality. To determine the short-term benefits of allogeneic blood stem cell transplants when compared to bone marrow transplants, we reviewed outcomes of 74 adults with advanced hematologic cancer transplanted from HLA-matched related donors after conditioning with thiotepa, busulfan and cyclophosphamide. There were three cohorts: group 1 received bone marrow transplants with cyclosporine (CsA) and methotrexate (MTX) for GVHD prophylaxis; group 2 received bone marrow transplants with CsA and methylprednisolone (MP); and group 3 received blood stem cells with CsA and MP. All patients received filgrastim post-transplant. Median times (range) to neutrophils 0.5 ´ 109/l were 17 (8-30), 9 (8-16) and 10 (8-13) days post-transplant, and to platelets 20 ´ 109/l were 28 (14-100+), 19 (13-100+) and 14 (9-86) days post-transplant for groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively (P < 0.05 only for group 1 vs group 3 for both outcomes). Blood stem cell recipients had the least regimen-related toxicity, fewest early deaths and earliest discharge. There was no significant difference in acute GVHD between the three groups. One hundred and eighty-day survivals (95% CI) were 53% (35-72%), 32% (10-53%), and 68% (49-87%) for groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively (P < 0.05 only for group 2 vs group 3). For allogeneic transplantation, use of blood stem cell grafts has substantial advantages over marrow grafts.

Keywords

allogeneic blood stem cell transplant; leukemia; treatment-related mortality

Received 8 February 1996; accepted 1 November 1996
March 1997, Volume 19, Number 5, Pages 455-460
Table of contents    Previous  Abstract  Next   Article  PDF