Short Communication

BJC Open article

British Journal of Cancer (2010) 102, 930–932. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6605556 www.bjcancer.com
Published online 9 February 2010

Distribution of HPV types associated with cervical cancers in Scotland and implications for the impact of HPV vaccines

K Cuschieri1, D H Brewster2, A R W Williams3, D Millan4, G Murray5, S Nicoll6, J Imrie7, A Hardie1, C Graham8 and H A Cubie1

  1. 1Scottish HPV Reference Laboratory, Specialist Virology Centre, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4SA, UK
  2. 2Scottish Cancer Registry, Information Services Division, NHS National Services Scotland, Edinburgh EH12 9EB, UK
  3. 3Department of Pathology, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4SA, UK
  4. 4Department of Pathology, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G4 OSF, UK
  5. 5Department of Pathology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen AB25 2ZN, UK
  6. 6Department of Pathology, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee DD1 9SY, UK
  7. 7Department of cytopathology, Monklands General Hospital, Airdrie ML6 OJS, UK
  8. 8Epidemiology and Statistics Core, Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Facility, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, UK

Correspondence: Professor HA Cubie, Scottish HPV Reference Laboratory, Specialist Virology Centre, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, 51 Little France Cres, Edinburgh EH16 4SA, UK. E-mail: Heather.Cubie@luht.scot.nhs.uk

Received 23 September 2009; Revised 9 December 2009; Accepted 4 January 2010
Advance online publication 9 February 2010

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Abstract

Background/metho:

  

This study evaluated human papillomavirus (HPV) type prevalence in 370 Scottish invasive cervical cancers (ICCs) using HPV genotyping and HPV mRNA detection.

Results:

  

HPV 16 and/or 18 was detected in 72% of cancers overall and in 82% of HPV-positive cancers. HPV 45 and 16 were the most frequently transcribed types.

Conclusion:

  

A significant reduction in ICC in Scotland should be achieved through the HPV immunisation programme.

Keywords:

HPV; genotyping; Scotland