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HEALTH BEHAVIOUR

More risks can feel less risky

In the United States, direct-to-consumer advertisements for medications must disclose each specific side-effect risk. A new study demonstrates a counterintuitive dilution effect: people perceive drug descriptions that include both serious and trivial side effects as less risky than descriptions that only list serious side effects.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-2029, USA

    • Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher

Authors

  1. Search for Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher in:

Competing interests

The author declares no competing interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Brian J. Zikmund-Fisher.