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Moral outrage in the digital age

Moral outrage is an ancient emotion that is now widespread on digital media and online social networks. How might these new technologies change the expression of moral outrage and its social consequences?

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Affiliations

  1. The Department of Psychology, Yale University, 2 Hillhouse Avenue, New Haven, CT, 06520, USA

    • M. J. Crockett

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Competing interests

The author declares no competing interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to M. J. Crockett.