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Evolution: Eating away at the social brain

Primates, especially humans, have large brains and this is thought to reflect our level of cognitive complexity or ‘intelligence’. Could this all be down to what we eat?

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Chris Venditti is in the School of Biological Sciences, University of Reading, Reading RG6 6AS, UK.

    • Chris Venditti

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Competing interests

The author declares no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Chris Venditti.