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Cultural evolution: Evolution of female genital cutting

Female genital cutting in five West African nations is frequency-dependent and is associated with higher reproductive success among ethnicities in which cutting predominates, a fitness advantage that may outweigh its costs to physical and psychological health.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Katherine Wander is at Binghamton University (SUNY) PO Box 6000 Binghamton, New York 13902-6000, USA.

    • Katherine Wander

Authors

  1. Search for Katherine Wander in:

Competing interests

The author declares no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Katherine Wander.