Opinion

Salience processing and insular cortical function and dysfunction

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Abstract

The brain is constantly bombarded by stimuli, and the relative salience of these inputs determines which are more likely to capture attention. A brain system known as the 'salience network', with key nodes in the insular cortices, has a central role in the detection of behaviourally relevant stimuli and the coordination of neural resources. Emerging evidence suggests that atypical engagement of specific subdivisions of the insula within the salience network is a feature of many neuropsychiatric disorders.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by a US National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Career Development Award (K01MH092288) and a Slifka/Ritvo Innovation in Autism Research Award from the International Society for Autism Research. The content is solely the responsibility of the author and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIMH or the US National Institutes of Health.

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Psychology, University of Miami, PO Box 248185–0751, Coral Gables, Florida 33124, USA, Neuroscience Program, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida 33136, USA.

    • Lucina Q. Uddin

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The author declares no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Lucina Q. Uddin.