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Functional and quantitative proteomics using SILAC

Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology volume 7, pages 952958 (2006) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Researchers in many biological areas now routinely characterize proteins by mass spectrometry. Among the many formats for quantitative proteomics, stable-isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) has emerged as a simple and powerful one. SILAC removes false positives in protein-interaction studies, reveals large-scale kinetics of proteomes and — as a quantitative phosphoproteomics technology — directly uncovers important points in the signalling pathways that control cellular decisions.

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Acknowledgements

I thank S.-E. Ong, L. Foster, B. Blagoev, J. Andersen and members of the Department for Proteomics and Signal Transduction for critical discussion of this manuscript. This work was supported by the Danish National Research Foundation and the Max-Planck Society.

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  1. Matthias Mann is at the Department of Proteomics and Signal Transduction, Max-Planck Institute for Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18, D-82152 Martinsried, Germany.  mmann@biochem.mpg.de

    • Matthias Mann

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The author declares no competing financial interests.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nrm2067

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