Science and Society | Published:

Science & society

Educating health-care professionals about genetics and genomics

Nature Reviews Genetics volume 8, pages 151157 (2007) | Download Citation

Subjects

Abstract

To biomedical researchers, this is the 'genome era'. Advances in genetics and genomics such as the sequence of the human genome, the human haplotype map, open access databases, cheaper genotyping and chemical genomics have already transformed basic and translational biomedical research. However, for most clinicians, the genome era has not yet arrived. For genomics to have an effect on clinical practice that is comparable to its impact on research will require advances in the genomic literacy of health-care providers. Here we describe the knowledge, skills and attitudes that genomic medicine will require, and approaches to integrate them into the health-care community.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    et al. Controlled 15-year trial on screening for colorectal cancer in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. Gastroenterology 118, 829–834 (2000).

  2. 2.

    Microarrays in cancer: moving from hype to clinical reality. Lancet 362, 1428 (2003).

  3. 3.

    et al. Mercaptopurine therapy intolerance and heterozygosity at the thiopurine S-methyltransferase gene locus. J. Natl Cancer Inst. 91, 2001–2008 (1999).

  4. 4.

    et al. The impact of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 genetic polymorphism and patient characteristics upon warfarin dose requirements: proposal for a new dosing regimen. Blood 106, 2329–2333 (2005).

  5. 5.

    , , & Prevalence and patterns of presentation of genetic disorders in a pediatric emergency department. Mayo Clin. Proc. 76, 777–783 (2001).

  6. 6.

    The HFE Cys282Tyr mutation as a necessary but not sufficient cause of clinical hereditary hemochromatosis. Blood 101, 47–50 (2003).

  7. 7.

    et al. GPs' views on their role in cancer genetics services and current practice. Fam. Pract. 16, 468–474 (1999).

  8. 8.

    World Health Organization. Genomics and world health: report of the Advisory Committee on Health Research , (2002).

  9. 9.

    et al. Genome sequence of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Nature 419, 498–511 (2002).

  10. 10.

    et al. The genome sequence of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae. Science 298, 129–149 (2002).

  11. 11.

    , & The genomics of malaria infection. Trends Parasitol. 20, 553–557 (2004).

  12. 12.

    Genetic Medicine: A Logic of Disease (Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, Baltimore, 1999).

  13. 13.

    , & (eds) Genomic Medicine (Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, Baltimore, 2004).

  14. 14.

    & Barriers to the provision of genetic services by primary care physicians: a systematic review of the literature. Genet. Med. 5, 70–76 (2003).

  15. 15.

    et al. Psychiatric genetics: a survey of psychiatrists' knowledge, attitudes, opinions, and practice patterns. J. Clin. Psychiatry 66, 821–830 (2005).

  16. 16.

    et al. Deficient knowledge of genetics relevant for daily practice among medical students nearing graduation. Genet. Med. 7, 295–301 (2005).

  17. 17.

    , & Deficiency of knowledge of genetics and genetics tests among general practitioners, gynecologists, and pediatricians: a global problem. Genet. Med. 7, 605–610 (2005).

  18. 18.

    , , & Genetic education for non-geneticist health professionals. Comm. Genet. 9, 224–226 (2006).

  19. 19.

    The Royal Society. Personalised medicines: hopes and realities , (2005).

  20. 20.

    Addressing Genetics, Delivering Health: A strategy for advancing the dissemination and application of genetics knowledge throughout our health professions , (2003).

  21. 21.

    et al. Ready for genomic medicine? Perspectives of health care decision makers. Arch. Intern. Med. 165, 1917–1919 (2005).

  22. 22.

    Genetics in medical practice: the need for ultimate makeover. Genet. Med. 7, 293–294 (2005).

  23. 23.

    & Will the learners be learned? Genet. Med. 4, 43–44 (2002).

  24. 24.

    , & Report of the Banbury meeting on training of physicians in medical genetics. Genet. Med. 7, 443–438 (2005).

  25. 25.

    The Society of Teachers of Family Medicine. Genetics in Primary Care: A Faculty Development Initiative , (2003).

  26. 26.

    et al. ATM mutations that cause ataxia-telangiectasia are breast cancer susceptibility alleles. Nature Genet. 38, 873–875 (2006).

  27. 27.

    et al. Interaction between CHEK2*1100delC and other low-penetrance breast-cancer susceptibility genes: a familial study. Lancet 366, 1554–1557 (2005).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Alan E. Guttmacher is at the National Human Genome Research Institute, Building 31, Room 4B09, Bethesda, MD 20892-2152, USA.

    • Alan E. Guttmacher
  2. Mary Porteous is at the SE Scotland Genetic Service, Western General Hospital, Crewe Road, Edinburgh EH4 2XU, Scotland.

    • Mary E. Porteous
  3. Joseph D. McInerney is at the National Coalition for Health Professional Education in Genetics, 2360 West Joppa Road, Suite 320, Lutherville, MD 21093, USA.

    • Joseph D. McInerney

Authors

  1. Search for Alan E. Guttmacher in:

  2. Search for Mary E. Porteous in:

  3. Search for Joseph D. McInerney in:

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Alan E. Guttmacher.

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nrg2007