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Data management and best practice for plant science

Plant research produces data in a profusion of types and scales, and in ever-increasing volume. What are the challenges and opportunities presented by data management in contemporary plant science? And how can researchers make efficient and fruitful use of data management tools and strategies?

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Sociology, Philosophy and Anthropology & Exeter Centre for the Study of the Life Sciences, Byrne House, Exeter University, Exeter EX4 4PJ, UK.

    • Sabina Leonelli
  2. School of Humanities, University of Adelaide, Adelaide 5005, Australia.

    • Sabina Leonelli
  3. The Earlham Institute, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7UG, UK.

    • Robert P. Davey
  4. Bioversity International, Parc Scientifique Agropolis II, 34397 Montpellier Cedex 5, France.

    • Elizabeth Arnaud
  5. GARNet, School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3AX, UK.

    • Geraint Parry
    •  & Ruth Bastow
  6. Global Plant Council, 1a Bow Lane, London EC4M 9EE, UK.

    • Ruth Bastow

Authors

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Sabina Leonelli.