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Crop yields: CO2 fertilization dries up

Nature Plants volume 2, Article number: 16138 (2016) | Download Citation

Rising atmospheric CO2 is expected to boost crop yields during drought events because it promotes stomatal closure and saves water. However, field experiments with soybean in a simulated future CO2 atmosphere suggest that crop canopy interactions with climate might prevent this mechanism from delivering its expected benefits.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Colin Osborne is in the Department of Animal and Plant Sciences and is Associate Director of the Grantham Centre for Sustainable Futures at the University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK.

    • Colin P. Osborne

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Correspondence to Colin P. Osborne.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nplants.2016.138

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