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Viral pathogenesis: Unlocking Ebola persistence

The 2013–2016 West African Ebola virus outbreak evidenced that the virus can persist in survivors long-term, leading to sequelae and risks of new transmission chains. Ebola virus has now been shown to behave similarly in rhesus macaques, enabling their use to study persistence and intervention strategies.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Trina Racine and Gary P. Kobinger are at the Centre de Recherche en Infectiologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Université Laval, 2705 boulevard Laurier Québec City, Québec G1V 2G4, Canada.

    • Trina Racine
    •  & Gary P. Kobinger

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Gary P. Kobinger.