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Dysbiosis is not an answer

Dysbiosis, an imbalance in the microbiota, has been a major organizing concept in microbiome science. Here, we discuss how the balance concept, a holdover from prescientific thought, is irrelevant to — and may even distract from — useful microbiome research.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Scott W. Olesen and Eric J. Alm are in the Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA.

    • Scott W. Olesen
    •  & Eric J. Alm

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to Eric J. Alm.