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Evolution: A four billion year old metabolism

Nature Microbiology volume 1, Article number: 16139 (2016) | Download Citation

Inspection of more than 286,000 gene families has shed light on the most recent common ancestors of all life. The last universal common ancestor was likely to have been a thermophilic, anaerobic, N2-fixing organism that used the Wood–Ljungdahl pathway to fix CO2, using H2 as an electron donor.

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Affiliations

  1. James O. McInerney is in the Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, Michael Smith building, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK.

    • James O. McInerney

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Correspondence to James O. McInerney.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nmicrobiol.2016.139

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