Brief Communication

Integrated network analysis platform for protein-protein interactions

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Abstract

There is an increasing demand for network analysis of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). We introduce a web-based protein interaction network analysis platform (PINA), which integrates PPI data from six databases and provides network construction, filtering, analysis and visualization tools. We demonstrated the advantages of PINA by analyzing two human PPI networks; our results suggested a link between LKB1 and TGFβ signaling, and revealed possible competitive interactors of p53 and c-Jun.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the European Union Sixth Framework Programme grant European Network for Functional Integration (LSHG-CT-2005-518254), Sigrid Jusélius Foundation, University of Helsinki's Research Funds, Academy of Finland (projects 125826, 213345 and 1121413), Finnish Cancer Association, Emil Aaltonen Foundation and competitive research funding of the Pirkanmaa Hospital District.

Author information

Author notes

    • Tea Vallenius
    •  & Kristian Ovaska

    These authors contributed equally to this work.

Affiliations

  1. Genome-Scale Biology Program, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Helsinki, Haartmaninkatu 8, Helsinki 00014, Finland.

    • Jianmin Wu
    • , Tea Vallenius
    • , Kristian Ovaska
    • , Tomi P Mäkelä
    •  & Sampsa Hautaniemi
  2. Institute of Medical Technology, University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital, Biokatu 8, Tampere 33520, Finland.

    • Jukka Westermarck
  3. Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, Tykistökatu 6A, Turku 23520, Finland.

    • Jukka Westermarck

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to Jianmin Wu.

Supplementary information

PDF files

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    Supplementary Text and Figures

    Supplementary Figures 1–3, Supplementary Methods

Excel files

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    Supplementary Table 1

    Classification of discarded interactions in the two case studies.