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Human and porcine early kidney precursors as a new source for transplantation

Nature Medicine volume 9, pages 5360 (2003) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Kidney transplantation has been one of the major medical advances of the past 30 years. However, tissue availability remains a major obstacle. This can potentially be overcome by the use of undifferentiated or partially developed kidney precursor cells derived from early embryos and fetal tissue. Here, transplantation in mice reveals the earliest gestational time point at which kidney precursor cells, of both human and pig origin, differentiate into functional nephrons and not into other, non-renal professional cell types. Moreover, successful organogenesis is achieved when using the early kidney precursors, but not later-gestation kidneys. The formed, miniature kidneys are functional as evidenced by the dilute urine they produce. In addition, decreased immunogenicity of the transplants of early human and pig kidney precursors compared with adult kidney transplants is demonstrated in vivo. Our data pinpoint a window of human and pig kidney organogenesis that may be optimal for transplantation in humans.

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Acknowledgements

Supported in part by a grant from Mrs. E. Drake and the Gabriella Rich Center for Transplantation Biology Research and the Edward H. Kass Award from the American Physicians Fellowship (B.D.). Y.R. holds the Henry H. Drake Professorial Chair in Immunology.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Immunology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel

    • Benjamin Dekel
    • , Tatyana Burakova
    • , Fabian D. Arditti
    • , Shlomit Reich-Zeliger
    • , Oren Milstein
    •  & Yair Reisner
  2. Department of Pediatrics, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel

    • Justen H. Passwell
  3. Functional Genomics Unit, Molecular Hemato-oncology and Respiratory Medicine, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel

    • Sarit Aviel-Ronen
    • , Gideon Rechavi
    •  & Naftali Kaminski
  4. Department of Pediatric Hemato-Oncology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel

    • Gideon Rechavi
  5. School of Computer Science and Engineering, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel

    • Nir Friedman

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Competing interests

Y.R. is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board and a shareholder of XTL Biopharmaceuticals, Ltd., Ness Ziona, Israel, which has an exclusive license from the Weizmann Institute of Science for the “Trimera” (human/mouse chimera) technology. However, this study was not funded by the company.

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Correspondence to Yair Reisner.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nm812