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Nuclear power: Unexpected health benefits

Public fears of nuclear power are widespread, especially in the aftermath of accidents, yet their benefits are rarely fully considered. A new study shows how the closure of two nuclear power plants in the 1980s increased air pollution and led to a measurable reduction in birth weights, a key indicator of future health outcomes.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Michael Shellenberger is at Environmental Progress, 2569 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, California 94704, USA.

    • Michael Shellenberger

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to Michael Shellenberger.