Perspective

The role of the US in the geopolitics of climate policy and stranded oil reserves

  • Nature Energy 1, Article number: 16158 (2016)
  • doi:10.1038/nenergy.2016.158
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Abstract

Computer-assisted technological innovation and breakthroughs in drilling are revolutionizing the energy landscape, creating greater uncertainty about the future trends for oil use. These new dynamics are prompting major oil producers to reconsider the commercial value of their assets, potentially changing the long-term outlook for oil prices. A shift in investment and production strategy by major oil-producing countries and large multinational companies to pre-empt the risk of stranded assets would have significant implications on energy markets. This Perspective surveys the competitive forces at play that are able to shift the dynamics of the global oil market and discusses their implications for US climate and energy policy. A declining long-term oil price might imply that energy and climate scientists and policymakers should revisit the road map of the optimum policies to promote the transition to lower carbon energy and to defend technology gains already achieved.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California, Davis, 1605 Tilia Street, Suite 100, Davis, California 95616, USA.

    • Amy Myers Jaffe

Authors

  1. Search for Amy Myers Jaffe in:

Competing interests

The author is a senior advisor to the Office of the Chief Investment Officer of the University of California.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Amy Myers Jaffe.