Review Article

Mechanisms underlying beneficial plant–fungus interactions in mycorrhizal symbiosis

  • Nature Communications 1, Article number: 48 (2010)
  • doi:10.1038/ncomms1046
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Abstract

Mycorrhizal fungi are a heterogeneous group of diverse fungal taxa, associated with the roots of over 90% of all plant species. Recently, state-of-the-art molecular and genetic tools, coupled to high-throughput sequencing and advanced microscopy, have led to the genome and transcriptome analysis of several symbionts. Signalling pathways between plants and fungi have now been described and the identification of several novel nutrient transporters has revealed some of the cellular processes that underlie symbiosis. Thus, the contributions of each partner in a mycorrhizal association are starting to be unravelled. This new knowledge is now available for use in agricultural practices.

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Acknowledgements

Contributions to this review were partly funded by the FISR-Soil Sink project, by Compagnia di San Paolo, Converging technologies (CIPE-BIOBIT) and MIUR PRIN 2008. We thank Raffaella Balestrini for generously providing an unpublished picture, Maria Teresa Della Beffa for helping to prepare the reference list, Robert Milne for his critical reading and Francis Martin for comments. We apologize to all those colleagues whose work was not cited because of space restrictions.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Plant Biology, University of Torino and IPP-CNR, Viale P.A. Mattioli 25, Torino 10125, Italy.

    • Paola Bonfante
    •  & Andrea Genre

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Paola Bonfante.

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